open access

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-04-11
Submitted: 2019-03-13
Accepted: 2019-04-07
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Reconstruction of lymphatic vessels in the mouse tail after cupping therapy

F.-W. Meng, Z.-L. Gao, L. Li, L.-L. Jie, P.-F. Yang, Z. Liang, Y.-W. Gao, W.-H. Liu
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0044
·
Pubmed: 30993665
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(1):98-104.

open access

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-04-11
Submitted: 2019-03-13
Accepted: 2019-04-07

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to investigate the regulatory mechanism of local lymphatic reconstruction after cupping therapy in a mouse model.

Materials and methods: The lymphatic reconstruction process in the mouse tail after cupping therapy as well as the expression levels of the vascular endothelial identification molecule CD34, prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1), and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1) were investigated for a duration of 4 days through immunohistochemistry experiments.

Results: On day 1 after cupping therapy, the CD34+ and LYVE-1+ cell densities were significantly increased, and the formed CD34+LYVE-1+ tubular structure started to express PROX1. This was followed by a decrease in both the CD34+ and LYVE-1+ stem cell densities to basal levels on the second day after cupping therapy. Both the CD34+ and LYVE-1+ cell densities subsequently increased again on the third day after cupping therapy. The increase in the LYVE-1+ density was accompanied by tubular structure formation, which is characteristic of lymphangiogenesis. In addition, the colocalisation of CD34+ and LYVE-1+ cells by immunohistochemistry suggests that the CD34+ stem cells differentiated into new lymphatic endothelial cells.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy involves upregulation of vascular and lymphatic endothelial markers (CD34+, LYVE-1+, and CD34+LYVE-1+) in local tissues, which in turn promotes local new lymphatic vessel formation through the expression of PROX1.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to investigate the regulatory mechanism of local lymphatic reconstruction after cupping therapy in a mouse model.

Materials and methods: The lymphatic reconstruction process in the mouse tail after cupping therapy as well as the expression levels of the vascular endothelial identification molecule CD34, prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1), and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1) were investigated for a duration of 4 days through immunohistochemistry experiments.

Results: On day 1 after cupping therapy, the CD34+ and LYVE-1+ cell densities were significantly increased, and the formed CD34+LYVE-1+ tubular structure started to express PROX1. This was followed by a decrease in both the CD34+ and LYVE-1+ stem cell densities to basal levels on the second day after cupping therapy. Both the CD34+ and LYVE-1+ cell densities subsequently increased again on the third day after cupping therapy. The increase in the LYVE-1+ density was accompanied by tubular structure formation, which is characteristic of lymphangiogenesis. In addition, the colocalisation of CD34+ and LYVE-1+ cells by immunohistochemistry suggests that the CD34+ stem cells differentiated into new lymphatic endothelial cells.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy involves upregulation of vascular and lymphatic endothelial markers (CD34+, LYVE-1+, and CD34+LYVE-1+) in local tissues, which in turn promotes local new lymphatic vessel formation through the expression of PROX1.

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Keywords

cupping, lymphatic regeneration, mice, LYVE-1, PROX1, CD34

About this article
Title

Reconstruction of lymphatic vessels in the mouse tail after cupping therapy

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)

Pages

98-104

Published online

2019-04-11

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0044

Pubmed

30993665

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(1):98-104.

Keywords

cupping
lymphatic regeneration
mice
LYVE-1
PROX1
CD34

Authors

F.-W. Meng
Z.-L. Gao
L. Li
L.-L. Jie
P.-F. Yang
Z. Liang
Y.-W. Gao
W.-H. Liu

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