open access

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-04-05
Submitted: 2019-01-31
Accepted: 2019-03-26
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Evaluation of the relationship between stylohyoid complex morphology and maxillary/mandibular position using cone beam computed tomography

D. Yılmaz, K. Orhan, E. Cesur
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0043
·
Pubmed: 30973636
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(1):148-155.

open access

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-04-05
Submitted: 2019-01-31
Accepted: 2019-03-26

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the morphologic features of the stylohyoid complex (SHC) and its relation to maxillomandibular position using three-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images.

Materials and methods: CBCT images from 157 individuals (74 females, 83 males) were analysed in this study. SHC length, width, and sagittal and transverse angles were measured. The subjects were grouped as skeletal class I, II, and III in order to determine the relative positions of the maxilla and mandible in the sagittal plane and as hypodivergent, normodivergent, and hyperdivergent according to the vertical rotation of the mandible in relation to the skull base. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used for statistical analysis.

Results: Mean SHC length was 23.56 ± 8.05 mm on the right side and 22.0 ± 6.51 mm on the left; mean SHC width was 3.31 ± 1.40 mm on the right and 2.93 ± 1.30 mm on the left. Mean sagittal angle was 27.43 ± 6.75° on the right side, 27.70 ± 6.51° on the left; mean transverse angle was 70.39 ± 4.59° on the right side and 71.79 ± 4.99° on the left. The only significant difference based on skeletal classification was greater SHC length among males compared to females in the class III group (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: No significant relationship was observed between SHC morphology and position of the maxilla or mandible. However, the gender difference observed among class III subjects suggests that SHC morphology may be affected by craniofacial morphology. Maxillofacial surgeons should investigate this anatomical landmark variation before surgical interventions involving this region, such as temporomandibular joint procedures.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the morphologic features of the stylohyoid complex (SHC) and its relation to maxillomandibular position using three-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images.

Materials and methods: CBCT images from 157 individuals (74 females, 83 males) were analysed in this study. SHC length, width, and sagittal and transverse angles were measured. The subjects were grouped as skeletal class I, II, and III in order to determine the relative positions of the maxilla and mandible in the sagittal plane and as hypodivergent, normodivergent, and hyperdivergent according to the vertical rotation of the mandible in relation to the skull base. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used for statistical analysis.

Results: Mean SHC length was 23.56 ± 8.05 mm on the right side and 22.0 ± 6.51 mm on the left; mean SHC width was 3.31 ± 1.40 mm on the right and 2.93 ± 1.30 mm on the left. Mean sagittal angle was 27.43 ± 6.75° on the right side, 27.70 ± 6.51° on the left; mean transverse angle was 70.39 ± 4.59° on the right side and 71.79 ± 4.99° on the left. The only significant difference based on skeletal classification was greater SHC length among males compared to females in the class III group (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: No significant relationship was observed between SHC morphology and position of the maxilla or mandible. However, the gender difference observed among class III subjects suggests that SHC morphology may be affected by craniofacial morphology. Maxillofacial surgeons should investigate this anatomical landmark variation before surgical interventions involving this region, such as temporomandibular joint procedures.

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Keywords

stylohyoid complex, maxillo-mandibular relation, mandibular rotation, cone beam computed tomography

About this article
Title

Evaluation of the relationship between stylohyoid complex morphology and maxillary/mandibular position using cone beam computed tomography

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)

Pages

148-155

Published online

2019-04-05

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0043

Pubmed

30973636

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(1):148-155.

Keywords

stylohyoid complex
maxillo-mandibular relation
mandibular rotation
cone beam computed tomography

Authors

D. Yılmaz
K. Orhan
E. Cesur

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