open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-06-27
Submitted: 2019-04-11
Accepted: 2019-05-08
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Morphology and morphometry of the semitendinosus distal tendon in adults and foetuses

D. W. Dziedzic, U. Bogacka, I. Komarniţki, B. Ciszek
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0068
·
Pubmed: 31257566
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):339-349.

open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-06-27
Submitted: 2019-04-11
Accepted: 2019-05-08

Abstract

Background: The distal tendon of the semitendinosus is often used as a graft in orthopedic reconstructive surgery. Knowledge of the exact morphology of this tendon, and also the ability to predict its morphometric data are certainly helpful when planning the procedure of surgery. Comparison of the semitendinosus distal tendon anatomy in adults and foetuses may be scientifically relevant. There are no scientific reports on this tendon anatomy in foetuses.

Materials and methods: Seventy semitendinosus muscles from cadavers were obtained using standard dissection techniques (50 muscles were obtained from adults and 20 from foetuses). Moreover, ultrasound examinations of 20 muscles were performed in living individuals.

Results: Two main parts of the distal tendon were distinguished — the external part not covered with muscle fibres and the internal part, which is partially or entirely hidden within the muscle belly (venter). The average length of the distal tendon was 32.34 cm, while the average lengths of the external and internal parts were 9.65 cm and 12.59 cm, respectively. The external part was solid and cylindrical. The internal part was flat and rolled like a trough, thus making the tendon a poor transplant material. Similarly, the distal tendon in foetuses consisted of two parts, including the external and internal part.

Conclusions: The proportions between the lengths of different muscle parts were very similar in adults and foetuses.

Abstract

Background: The distal tendon of the semitendinosus is often used as a graft in orthopedic reconstructive surgery. Knowledge of the exact morphology of this tendon, and also the ability to predict its morphometric data are certainly helpful when planning the procedure of surgery. Comparison of the semitendinosus distal tendon anatomy in adults and foetuses may be scientifically relevant. There are no scientific reports on this tendon anatomy in foetuses.

Materials and methods: Seventy semitendinosus muscles from cadavers were obtained using standard dissection techniques (50 muscles were obtained from adults and 20 from foetuses). Moreover, ultrasound examinations of 20 muscles were performed in living individuals.

Results: Two main parts of the distal tendon were distinguished — the external part not covered with muscle fibres and the internal part, which is partially or entirely hidden within the muscle belly (venter). The average length of the distal tendon was 32.34 cm, while the average lengths of the external and internal parts were 9.65 cm and 12.59 cm, respectively. The external part was solid and cylindrical. The internal part was flat and rolled like a trough, thus making the tendon a poor transplant material. Similarly, the distal tendon in foetuses consisted of two parts, including the external and internal part.

Conclusions: The proportions between the lengths of different muscle parts were very similar in adults and foetuses.

Get Citation

Keywords

hamstring, foetal muscle, tendon

About this article
Title

Morphology and morphometry of the semitendinosus distal tendon in adults and foetuses

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)

Pages

339-349

Published online

2019-06-27

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0068

Pubmed

31257566

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):339-349.

Keywords

hamstring
foetal muscle
tendon

Authors

D. W. Dziedzic
U. Bogacka
I. Komarniţki
B. Ciszek

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