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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-29
Submitted: 2018-09-13
Accepted: 2018-10-10
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Acrylamide adverse cerebellar changes in rats: possible oligodendrogenic role of omega 3 and green tea

R. A. Imam, H. N. Gadallah
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0105
·
Pubmed: 30402879

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-29
Submitted: 2018-09-13
Accepted: 2018-10-10

Abstract

Background: Humans are widely exposed to Acrylamide (ACR) and its neurotoxicity is a significant public health issue attracting wide attention.

Aim of work: Investigating ACR-induced adverse cerebellar changes in rats and studying the possible Oligodendrogenic role of Omega 3 and Green Tea.

Material and Methods: Twenty four adult albino rats weighing 150 -200gm were randomly divided into four equal groups (6 rats each) as follows; Group I: (control), Group II: The rats received ACR 45mg/kg/day, Group III: The rats received ACR concomitant with Omega3 at a dosage of 200mg/kg/day, Group IV: The rats received ACR concomitant with Green Tea dissolved in drinking water at a dosage of 5gm/litre. The rats were euthanized 8 weeks from the experiment. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Glutathione (GSH) were measured in cerebellar homogenates. Sections of 5 µm thickness from specimens from the cerebellum were stained with Hx & E, Silver stain and immunohistochemical stains; PDGFα (for Oligodendrocytes), GFAP (for Astrocytes) and BCL2 (Antiapoptotic).

Results: Omega3 and Green Tea had improved MDA & GSH as compared to ACR group. Histologically, ACR group showed variable degrees of cellular degeneration. Omega3 had induced Oligodendrogenesis in group III. The optical density of silver stain was significantly p<0.05 increased in group III & IV as compared to ACR group. Area % of positive PDGFα was significantly increased in ACR+omega3 group as compared to ACR group. Area % of positive GFAP was significantly decreased in group III & IV as compared to ACR group. Area % of positive BCL2 was significantly increased in omega3 received groups as compared to ACR group.

Conclusions: Concomitant administration of Omega 3 or green Tea with ACR might mitigate its adverse cerebellar changes with an Oligodendrogenic role of Omega 3.

Abstract

Background: Humans are widely exposed to Acrylamide (ACR) and its neurotoxicity is a significant public health issue attracting wide attention.

Aim of work: Investigating ACR-induced adverse cerebellar changes in rats and studying the possible Oligodendrogenic role of Omega 3 and Green Tea.

Material and Methods: Twenty four adult albino rats weighing 150 -200gm were randomly divided into four equal groups (6 rats each) as follows; Group I: (control), Group II: The rats received ACR 45mg/kg/day, Group III: The rats received ACR concomitant with Omega3 at a dosage of 200mg/kg/day, Group IV: The rats received ACR concomitant with Green Tea dissolved in drinking water at a dosage of 5gm/litre. The rats were euthanized 8 weeks from the experiment. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Glutathione (GSH) were measured in cerebellar homogenates. Sections of 5 µm thickness from specimens from the cerebellum were stained with Hx & E, Silver stain and immunohistochemical stains; PDGFα (for Oligodendrocytes), GFAP (for Astrocytes) and BCL2 (Antiapoptotic).

Results: Omega3 and Green Tea had improved MDA & GSH as compared to ACR group. Histologically, ACR group showed variable degrees of cellular degeneration. Omega3 had induced Oligodendrogenesis in group III. The optical density of silver stain was significantly p<0.05 increased in group III & IV as compared to ACR group. Area % of positive PDGFα was significantly increased in ACR+omega3 group as compared to ACR group. Area % of positive GFAP was significantly decreased in group III & IV as compared to ACR group. Area % of positive BCL2 was significantly increased in omega3 received groups as compared to ACR group.

Conclusions: Concomitant administration of Omega 3 or green Tea with ACR might mitigate its adverse cerebellar changes with an Oligodendrogenic role of Omega 3.

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Keywords

acrylamide, cerebellum, omega 3, green tea, rats, oligodendrocytes

About this article
Title

Acrylamide adverse cerebellar changes in rats: possible oligodendrogenic role of omega 3 and green tea

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2018-10-29

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0105

Pubmed

30402879

Keywords

acrylamide
cerebellum
omega 3
green tea
rats
oligodendrocytes

Authors

R. A. Imam
H. N. Gadallah

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