open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-09
Submitted: 2018-09-04
Accepted: 2018-09-27
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Mandibular tori are associated with mandibular bone quality: a case-control study

N. Koç, L. B. Çağırankaya
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0094
·
Pubmed: 30311937
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):736-741.

open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-09
Submitted: 2018-09-04
Accepted: 2018-09-27

Abstract

Background: Torus mandibularis (TM) is one of the most common oral exostoses. The presence of TMs has been correlated with high skeletal bone mineral density. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between TM and mandibular bone quality based on the measurement of mandibular cortical index (MCI).

Materials and methods: A case-control study was designed for patients who attended the Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology at the University of Hacettepe for routine dental examination. Patients with TMs were defined as cases, and those without TMs were defined as controls. The presence of tori was assessed by visual inspection and digital palpation. MCI assessments were done based on Klemetti’s classification. The associations between the presence of TMs, MCI, and the parafunctional activity were assessed.

Results: The sample consisted of 80 subjects with TMs and 80 control subjects. The presence of TMs was strongly associated with the parafunctional activity (p = 0.036) and a non-eroded mandibular cortex (MCI C1, p = 0.001).

Conclusions: Parafunctional activity may be a factor related to the formation or existence of TMs. The association between TMs and mandibular morphology may suggest that subjects with TMs may have a higher mandibular bone quality compared to those without TMs.

Abstract

Background: Torus mandibularis (TM) is one of the most common oral exostoses. The presence of TMs has been correlated with high skeletal bone mineral density. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between TM and mandibular bone quality based on the measurement of mandibular cortical index (MCI).

Materials and methods: A case-control study was designed for patients who attended the Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology at the University of Hacettepe for routine dental examination. Patients with TMs were defined as cases, and those without TMs were defined as controls. The presence of tori was assessed by visual inspection and digital palpation. MCI assessments were done based on Klemetti’s classification. The associations between the presence of TMs, MCI, and the parafunctional activity were assessed.

Results: The sample consisted of 80 subjects with TMs and 80 control subjects. The presence of TMs was strongly associated with the parafunctional activity (p = 0.036) and a non-eroded mandibular cortex (MCI C1, p = 0.001).

Conclusions: Parafunctional activity may be a factor related to the formation or existence of TMs. The association between TMs and mandibular morphology may suggest that subjects with TMs may have a higher mandibular bone quality compared to those without TMs.

Get Citation

Keywords

torus mandibularis, exostosis, panoramic radiography, mandibular cortical index

About this article
Title

Mandibular tori are associated with mandibular bone quality: a case-control study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)

Pages

736-741

Published online

2018-10-09

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0094

Pubmed

30311937

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):736-741.

Keywords

torus mandibularis
exostosis
panoramic radiography
mandibular cortical index

Authors

N. Koç
L. B. Çağırankaya

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