open access

Vol 78, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-07-06
Submitted: 2018-04-29
Accepted: 2018-06-25
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Anatomical evaluation of nasopalatine canal on cone beam computed tomography images

I. Bahşi, M. Orhan, P. Kervancıoğlu, E. D. Yalçın, A. M. Aktan
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0062
·
Pubmed: 30009362
·
Folia Morphol 2019;78(1):153-162.

open access

Vol 78, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-07-06
Submitted: 2018-04-29
Accepted: 2018-06-25

Abstract

Background: Nasopalatine canal (NPC) (incisive canal) morphology is important for oral surgery techniques carried out on the maxilla, in the treatment of naso- palatine cyst, palatal pathologies that require a surgical intervention.

Materials and methods: The morphology of NPC was classified in sagittal, coronal and axial planes on the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The length of NPC was found by measuring the distance between the mid-points of nasopalatine foramen and incisive foramen. The numbers, shapes and diameters of incisive and nasopalatine foramina were examined. Nasopalatine angle present between the NPC and the palate and anterior to the NPC was measured. 

Results: In the sagittal plane, the shape of NPC was classified in six groups: 26.7% hourglass, 14.7% cone, 13.3% funnel, 16.0% banana, 28.7% cylindrical and 0.7% reverse-cone-shaped. In the coronal plane, shape of NPC was classified in three groups: 63.3% Y-shaped, 36.0% single canal, 0.7% double canal and external border of NPC was classified in four groups: 26.7% U, 28.7% Y, 44.0% V and 0.7% reverse-V-shaped. In the axial plane, the shape of nasopalatine foramen, incisive foramen and NPC at the mid-level was evaluated. The shape of the canal was detected as four types at three evaluated levels: round, oval, heart- and triangle-shaped. It was seen in every three axial planes that the round group is more than the others. 

Conclusions: The morphological properties and variations of NPC should be con- sidered with a correct radiological evaluation so as to prevent the complications and improper practices in local anaesthesia, maxillary surgery and implant surgery practices. Especially dentists, otolaryngologist and plastic surgeons need to know the anatomy and variations of NPC. 

Abstract

Background: Nasopalatine canal (NPC) (incisive canal) morphology is important for oral surgery techniques carried out on the maxilla, in the treatment of naso- palatine cyst, palatal pathologies that require a surgical intervention.

Materials and methods: The morphology of NPC was classified in sagittal, coronal and axial planes on the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The length of NPC was found by measuring the distance between the mid-points of nasopalatine foramen and incisive foramen. The numbers, shapes and diameters of incisive and nasopalatine foramina were examined. Nasopalatine angle present between the NPC and the palate and anterior to the NPC was measured. 

Results: In the sagittal plane, the shape of NPC was classified in six groups: 26.7% hourglass, 14.7% cone, 13.3% funnel, 16.0% banana, 28.7% cylindrical and 0.7% reverse-cone-shaped. In the coronal plane, shape of NPC was classified in three groups: 63.3% Y-shaped, 36.0% single canal, 0.7% double canal and external border of NPC was classified in four groups: 26.7% U, 28.7% Y, 44.0% V and 0.7% reverse-V-shaped. In the axial plane, the shape of nasopalatine foramen, incisive foramen and NPC at the mid-level was evaluated. The shape of the canal was detected as four types at three evaluated levels: round, oval, heart- and triangle-shaped. It was seen in every three axial planes that the round group is more than the others. 

Conclusions: The morphological properties and variations of NPC should be con- sidered with a correct radiological evaluation so as to prevent the complications and improper practices in local anaesthesia, maxillary surgery and implant surgery practices. Especially dentists, otolaryngologist and plastic surgeons need to know the anatomy and variations of NPC. 

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Keywords

cone beam computed tomography; nasopalatine canal; nasopalatine foramen; incisive foramen

About this article
Title

Anatomical evaluation of nasopalatine canal on cone beam computed tomography images

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 78, No 1 (2019)

Pages

153-162

Published online

2018-07-06

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0062

Pubmed

30009362

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2019;78(1):153-162.

Keywords

cone beam computed tomography
nasopalatine canal
nasopalatine foramen
incisive foramen

Authors

I. Bahşi
M. Orhan
P. Kervancıoğlu
E. D. Yalçın
A. M. Aktan

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