open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-08-09
Submitted: 2018-04-02
Accepted: 2018-05-27
Get Citation

Renoprotective effect of red grape (Vitis vinifera L.) juice and dark raisins against hypercholesterolemia-induced tubular renal affection in albino rats

Soad Ali, Etedal Abbas Huwait, Raid Hamdy, Ahlam Alahmadi, Abeer Alansari, Nasra Ayuob
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0069
·
Pubmed: 30106463

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-08-09
Submitted: 2018-04-02
Accepted: 2018-05-27

Abstract

Background: Red grape juice (RGJ) and dark raisins (DR) are rich in polyphenols and antioxidants. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of RGJ and DR in protecting the renal tubules against hypercholesteremic-induced pathological changes. Materials and methods: Forty albino rats divided into 4 groups (n=10) were utilized in this study. They included the control, High cholesterol diet (HCD)-fed, HCD+RGJ)-fed, HCD+DR fed groups. Body weight gain, food and water intake, blood and insulin levels, lipid profile and kidney functions were assessed at the start of the experiment and after 12 weeks. The right kidney was dissected out and processed for both light and electron microscopic examination. Desmin and cytokeratin antibodies were utilized as histologic markers to assess the integrity of the proximal (PTs) and distal tubules (DTs) of the kidney. Results: Administration of HCD resulted in hypercholesteremia in rats as evident by the lipid profile. The PTs of hypercholesteremic rats appeared dilated with hyaline casts and mitochondria in most of the tubular cells were affected. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed affection of both PTs and DTs. Both RGJ and DR, when administrated along with the HCD for 12 weeks, improved the lipid profile, kidney functions as well as the histologic and cellular changes-induced by hypercholesterolemia in the rats. The effect of raisins was superior to RGJ which might be due to its high contents of fibers and proteins. Conclusions: This study highlighted the importance of supplementation of red grape and raisins in protection against the harmful effects induced by deposition of fat on the renal tubules structure and function.

Abstract

Background: Red grape juice (RGJ) and dark raisins (DR) are rich in polyphenols and antioxidants. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of RGJ and DR in protecting the renal tubules against hypercholesteremic-induced pathological changes. Materials and methods: Forty albino rats divided into 4 groups (n=10) were utilized in this study. They included the control, High cholesterol diet (HCD)-fed, HCD+RGJ)-fed, HCD+DR fed groups. Body weight gain, food and water intake, blood and insulin levels, lipid profile and kidney functions were assessed at the start of the experiment and after 12 weeks. The right kidney was dissected out and processed for both light and electron microscopic examination. Desmin and cytokeratin antibodies were utilized as histologic markers to assess the integrity of the proximal (PTs) and distal tubules (DTs) of the kidney. Results: Administration of HCD resulted in hypercholesteremia in rats as evident by the lipid profile. The PTs of hypercholesteremic rats appeared dilated with hyaline casts and mitochondria in most of the tubular cells were affected. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed affection of both PTs and DTs. Both RGJ and DR, when administrated along with the HCD for 12 weeks, improved the lipid profile, kidney functions as well as the histologic and cellular changes-induced by hypercholesterolemia in the rats. The effect of raisins was superior to RGJ which might be due to its high contents of fibers and proteins. Conclusions: This study highlighted the importance of supplementation of red grape and raisins in protection against the harmful effects induced by deposition of fat on the renal tubules structure and function.

Get Citation

Keywords

kidney-grapes-raisins-hpercholesterolemia-function-structure

About this article
Title

Renoprotective effect of red grape (Vitis vinifera L.) juice and dark raisins against hypercholesterolemia-induced tubular renal affection in albino rats

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2018-08-09

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0069

Pubmed

30106463

Keywords

kidney-grapes-raisins-hpercholesterolemia-function-structure

Authors

Soad Ali
Etedal Abbas Huwait
Raid Hamdy
Ahlam Alahmadi
Abeer Alansari
Nasra Ayuob

References (46)
  1. Abdel-Hamid, g A. Effect of red grape juice on renal glomeruli in hypercholestremic rats. Life Science J. 2014; 11(6): 234–245.
  2. Almajwal AM. Elsadek MF. Lipid-lowering and hepatoprotective effects of Vitis vinifera dried seeds on paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Nutrition Res Pract. 2015; 9(1): 37–42.
  3. Altunkaynak ME, Ozbek E, Altunkaynak BZ, et al. The effects of high-fat diet on the renal structure and morphometric parametric of kidneys in rats. J Anat. 2008; 212(6): 845–852.
  4. Anderson JW, Waters AR. Raisin consumption by humans: effects on glycemia and insulinemia and cardiovascular risk factors. J Food Sci. 2013; 78 Suppl 1: A11–A17.
  5. Ayuob N. Can raisins ameliorate hypercholesterolemia-induced nephropathy? What is the evidence? Egypt J Histol. 2014; 37(4): 677–688.
  6. Bagchi D, Bagchi M, Stohs Sj, et al. Cellular protection with proanthocyanidins derived from grape seeds. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002; 957: 260–270.
  7. Baghdadi H. Antioxidant potential of quercetin: remarkable protection against hypercholesterolemia in rats. Br J Med Med Res. 2014; 4(26): 4382–4391.
  8. Balarini CM, Oliveira MZt, Pereira TMc, et al. Hypercholesterolemia promotes early renal dysfunction in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Lipids Health Dis. 2011; 10: 220.
  9. Bipasha M, Goon S. Fast food preferences and food habits among students of private universities in Bangladesh. South East Asia Journal of Public Health. 2014; 3(1): 61–64.
  10. Bladé C, Arola L, Salvadó MJ. Hypolipidemic effects of proanthocyanidins and their underlying biochemical and molecular mechanisms. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010; 54(1): 37–59.
  11. Castilla P, Echarri R, Dلvalos AD, et al. and Lasuncin MA. Concentrated red grape juice exerts antioxidant, hypolipidemic, and antiinflammatory effects in both hemodialysis patients and healthy subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006; 84: 252–62.
  12. Curthoys NP, Moe OW. Proximal tubule function and response to acidosis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2014; 9(9): 1627–1638.
  13. D'Amico G. Tubulo-interstitial damage in glomerular diseases: its role in the progression of the renal damage. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1998; 13 Suppl 1: 80–85.
  14. Doshi P, Adsule P, Banerjee K, et al. Phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and insulinotropic effect of extracts prepared from grape (Vitis vinifera L) byproducts. J Food Sci Technol. 2015; 52(1): 181–190.
  15. Drury RAB. and Wallington EA. Carleton histological technique. Oxford. New York. Toronto. Oxford University Press. 1980.
  16. Emma F, Montini G, Parikh S, et al. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inherited renal disease and acute kidney injury. Nature Reviews Nephrology. 2016; 12(5): 267–280.
  17. Feng R, Lu Y, Bowman LL, et al. Inhibition of activator protein-1, NF-kappaB, and MAPKs and induction of phase 2 detoxifying enzyme activity by chlorogenic acid. J Biol Chem. 2005; 280(30): 27888–27895.
  18. González-Centeno MR, Jourdes M, Femenia A, et al. Proanthocyanidin composition and antioxidant potential of the stem winemaking byproducts from 10 different grape varieties (Vitis vinifera L.). J Agric Food Chem. 2012; 60(48): 11850–11858.
  19. Healy E, Brady HR. Role of tubule epithelial cells in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced by glomerular disease. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 1998; 7(5): 525–530.
  20. Innis SM. Dietary lipids in early development: relevance to obesity, immune and inflammatory disorders. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2007; 14(5): 359–364.
  21. Jiang T, Wang Z, Proctor G, et al. Diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J mice causes increased renal lipid accumulation and glomerulosclerosis via a sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c-dependent pathway. J Biol Chem. 2005; 280(37): 32317–32325.
  22. Johannessen J. Instruction and techniques in electron microscopy in human medicine. Mchqraw-Hill Int., Book Co 1978.
  23. Joles JA, Kunter U, Janssen U, et al. Early mechanisms of renal injury in hypercholesterolemic or hypertriglyceridemic rats. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2000; 11(4): 669–683.
  24. Kang JS, Lee WK, Lee CW, et al. Improvement of high-fat diet-induced obesity by a mixture of red grape extract, soy isoflavone and L-carnitine: implications in cardiovascular and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases. Food Chem Toxicol. 2011; 49(9): 2453–2458.
  25. Kwok CY, Wong CY, Yau MC, et al. Consumption of dried fruit of Crataegus pinnatifida (hawthorn) suppresses high-cholesterol diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats. J Funct Foods. 2010; 2(3): 179–186.
  26. Lee J, Hong J, Lee K, et al. Endovascular therapy of cerebral arterial occlusions: intracranial atherosclerosis versus embolism. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2015; 24(9): 2074–2080.
  27. Li S, Chen G, Zhang C, et al. Research progress of natural antioxidants in foods for the treatment of diseases. Food Sci Hum Well. 2014; 3(3-4): 110–116.
  28. Mazza A, Lenti S, Schiavon L, et al. Nutraceuticals for serum lipid and blood pressure control in hypertensive and hypercholesterolemic subjects at low cardiovascular risk. Adv Ther. 2015; 32(7): 680–690.
  29. Mount P, Davies M, Choy SW, et al. Obesity-Related chronic kidney disease-the role of lipid metabolism. Metabolites. 2015; 5(4): 720–732.
  30. Muchaneta-Kubara EC, el Nahas AM. Myofibroblast phenotypes expression in experimental renal scarring. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997; 12(5): 904–915.
  31. Ong A, Fine L. Tubular-Derived growth factors and cytokines in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial fibrosis: implications for human renal disease progression. Am J Kidney Dis. 1994; 23(2): 205–209.
  32. Otunola GA, Oloyede OB, Oladiji AT. Effects of diet induced hypercholesterolemia on the lipid profile and some enzyme activities in female Wistar rat. Afr J Biochem Res. 2015; 4(6): 149–154.
  33. Petrica L, Marius R, Schiller A, et al. Prognosis Markers Of Tubulointerstitial Injury In Primary Type I Mesangiocapillary Glomerulonephritis. FACTA UNIVERSITATIS Series: Medicine and Biology. 2001; 8(1): 19.
  34. Pinheiro FV, Pimentel VC, De Bona KS, et al. Decrease of adenosine deaminase activity and increase of the lipid peroxidation after acute methotrexate treatment in young rats: protective effects of grape seed extract. Cell Biochem Funct. 2010; 28(1): 89–94.
  35. Preuss HG, Wallerstedt D, Talpur N, et al. Effects of niacin-bound chromium and grape seed proanthocyanidin extract on the lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic subjects: a pilot study. J Med. 2000; 31(5-6): 227–246.
  36. Safa J, Argani H, Bastani B, et al. Protective effect of grape seed extract on gentamicin-induced acute kidney injury. Iran J Kidney Dis. 2010; 4(4): 285–291.
  37. Sousa E, Uchôa-Thomaz A, Carioca J, et al. Chemical composition and bioactive compounds of grape pomace (Vitis vinifera L.), Benitaka variety, grown in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil. Food Sci Tech (Campinas). 2014; 34(1): 135–142.
  38. Spiller GA, Story JA, Furumoto EJ, et al. Effect of tartaric acid and dietary fibre from sun-dried raisins on colonic function and on bile acid and volatile fatty acid excretion in healthy adults. Br J Nutr. 2003; 90(4): 803–807.
  39. Stemmer K, Perez-Tilve D, Ananthakrishnan G, et al. High-fat-diet-induced obesity causes an inflammatory and tumor-promoting microenvironment in the rat kidney. Dis Model Mech. 2012; 5(5): 627–635.
  40. Taylor R, Hayes KE, Toth LA. Evaluation of an anesthetic regimen for retroorbital blood collection from mice. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2000; 39(2): 14–17.
  41. Thiruchenduran M, Vijayan NA, Sawaminathan JK, et al. Protective effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins against cholesterol cholic acid diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats. Cardiovasc Pathol. 2011; 20(6): 361–368.
  42. Wan CW, Wong CNY, Pin WK, et al. Chlorogenic acid exhibits cholesterol lowering and fatty liver attenuating properties by up-regulating the gene expression of PPAR-α in hypercholesterolemic rats induced with a high-cholesterol diet. Phytother Res. 2013; 27(4): 545–551.
  43. Zern TL, Fernandez ML. Cardioprotective effects of dietary polyphenols. J Nutr. 2005; 135(10): 2291–2294.
  44. Zhang Q, Raoof M, Chen Yu, et al. Circulating mitochondrial DAMPs cause inflammatory responses to injury. Nature. 2010; 464(7285): 104–107.
  45. Zoecklein B, Fugelsang K, Gump B, et al. Phenolic compounds and wine color. Production Wine Analysis. 1990: 129–168.
  46. Zoja C, Abbate M, Remuzzi G. Progression of renal injury toward interstitial inflammation and glomerular sclerosis is dependent on abnormal protein filtration. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2015; 30(5): 706–712.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl