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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-07-17
Submitted: 2018-03-28
Accepted: 2018-05-30
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Distribution of EGFR, BMP-2, and p53 in kidney of healthy newborn, adult and old highland-plateau yaks

Ting Wang, Yan Cui, Penggang Liu, Junfeng He, Qian Zhang
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0067
·
Pubmed: 30106465

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-07-17
Submitted: 2018-03-28
Accepted: 2018-05-30

Abstract

Background: Kidney has long been thought to be a body's largest organ of elimination for maintain acid-base balance. In recent years, the research on kidneys has mainly focused on the structural characteristics of the kidney of single age group animals. In this Paper we used histological and immunohistochemical methods to observe and compare the structure characteristics of yak kidney and the expression of EGFR BMP-2 and p53 in the kidney of yaks of three different age groups.

Aims: To investigate histological characteristics of age-related changes in the kidney of yak and expression and localization of kidney related factors.

Methods: 15 healthy males and females yaks from highland plateaus (three groups: newborn, adult and old yaks,n=5 per group). Histological methods were used to compare the relevant characteristics of the kidney of yaks. The immunohistochemistry method was used to observe the expression and localization of EGFR, BMP-2, and p53 of the kidney of different ages, and the optical density value was measured and analyzed by using image analysis software.

Results: Histological observations showed that yak kidneys consisted of the surface of the membrane and the internal substance. A substance included cortex and medulla, which were bounded by the arched artery. In the cortex, there were renal corpuscles, convoluted part of renal tubules (Proximal convoluted tubule and distal convoluted tubule) and collecting tubules. Medulla included straight part of renal tubules (Proximal straight tubule and distal straight tubule), thin segments and collecting tubules. It was observed that the organizational structure of the kidney of yaks did not change with the age, but the degree of development of the internal structure (glomeruli, renal tubules and collecting tubules) of the kidney changed with age. Immunohistochemical results demonstrated that EGFR, BMP-2 positive reaction in the newborn group was mainly distributed in the proximal tubule epithelial cells, and widely distributed in the adult and old groups. However, the p53 positive reaction was widely distributed from the newborn, adult and old groups.

Conclusions: The results revealed that the kidney structure tended to be completed-with age, and the function of the kidney gradually improved. EGFR and BMP-2 had the effect of promoting kidney development. However, p53 had been widely distributed in the newborn kidney of the yaks. It is suggested that p53 had been involved in cell migration and metabolic differentiation and self-renewal in the new stage.

Abstract

Background: Kidney has long been thought to be a body's largest organ of elimination for maintain acid-base balance. In recent years, the research on kidneys has mainly focused on the structural characteristics of the kidney of single age group animals. In this Paper we used histological and immunohistochemical methods to observe and compare the structure characteristics of yak kidney and the expression of EGFR BMP-2 and p53 in the kidney of yaks of three different age groups.

Aims: To investigate histological characteristics of age-related changes in the kidney of yak and expression and localization of kidney related factors.

Methods: 15 healthy males and females yaks from highland plateaus (three groups: newborn, adult and old yaks,n=5 per group). Histological methods were used to compare the relevant characteristics of the kidney of yaks. The immunohistochemistry method was used to observe the expression and localization of EGFR, BMP-2, and p53 of the kidney of different ages, and the optical density value was measured and analyzed by using image analysis software.

Results: Histological observations showed that yak kidneys consisted of the surface of the membrane and the internal substance. A substance included cortex and medulla, which were bounded by the arched artery. In the cortex, there were renal corpuscles, convoluted part of renal tubules (Proximal convoluted tubule and distal convoluted tubule) and collecting tubules. Medulla included straight part of renal tubules (Proximal straight tubule and distal straight tubule), thin segments and collecting tubules. It was observed that the organizational structure of the kidney of yaks did not change with the age, but the degree of development of the internal structure (glomeruli, renal tubules and collecting tubules) of the kidney changed with age. Immunohistochemical results demonstrated that EGFR, BMP-2 positive reaction in the newborn group was mainly distributed in the proximal tubule epithelial cells, and widely distributed in the adult and old groups. However, the p53 positive reaction was widely distributed from the newborn, adult and old groups.

Conclusions: The results revealed that the kidney structure tended to be completed-with age, and the function of the kidney gradually improved. EGFR and BMP-2 had the effect of promoting kidney development. However, p53 had been widely distributed in the newborn kidney of the yaks. It is suggested that p53 had been involved in cell migration and metabolic differentiation and self-renewal in the new stage.

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Keywords

bone morphogenetic protein-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, kidney, tumor suppressive gene p53, Yak

About this article
Title

Distribution of EGFR, BMP-2, and p53 in kidney of healthy newborn, adult and old highland-plateau yaks

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2018-07-17

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0067

Pubmed

30106465

Keywords

bone morphogenetic protein-2
epidermal growth factor receptor
kidney
tumor suppressive gene p53
Yak

Authors

Ting Wang
Yan Cui
Penggang Liu
Junfeng He
Qian Zhang

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