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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-05-17
Submitted: 2018-03-18
Accepted: 2018-04-30
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Hand anthropometry in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a case-control study with a matched control group of healthy volunteers

Marek Trybus, Beata Stepańczak, Mateusz Koziej, Maksymilian Gniadek, Małgorzata Kołodziej, Mateusz Hołda
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0049
·
Pubmed: 29802717

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-05-17
Submitted: 2018-03-18
Accepted: 2018-04-30

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to perform anthropometrical measurements of patients’ hands with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in order to evaluate if there is a correlation between CTS occurrence and hand features regarding sexual dimorphism, age and physical activity.

Materials and methods: Study sample consisted of 48 patients (33 females) and control group included 80 healthy volunteers (56 females) with no history of CTS. Following measurements were performed: the wrist circumference, length of the hand, the hand’s width, width of the wrist, thickness of the wrist, height of the hypothenar and thenar, length of the arm and forearm, circumference of the proximal phalanges and width of the digits; as well as several indexes were calculated i.e.: BMI, shape index, digit index, wrist index, hand length/height ratio (HLH-ratio) and hand length/upper limb length ratio (HLULL-ratio).

Results: Correlation coincidences were analyzed between circumferences within the hand, palm and body weight. All parameters except fingers were correlated with body weight in either gender in both groups (p<0.05; r=0.40-0.80); Furthermore, width of the hand was correlated with body height (p<0.001; r=0.56-0.71). Mean values of wrist index for CTS patients were: males: 0.8, females: 0.74 (significantly higher than in healthy individuals and indicating square shape); shape index: males: 76.5, females: 75.8; digit index: males: 55.7, females: 56.5. The calculated HLH-ratio in CTS group was: males: 10.6, females: 10.9; HLULL-ratio: males: 23.6, females: 24.9 and they did not differ significantly from healthy volunteers. Almost 90.0% of females with diagnosed CTS have BMI>25.0kg/m2.

Conclusions: There are significant differences in morphometrical features of the upper limbs between CTS patients and healthy individuals. Hands of patients with CTS are more massive and with ‘plumb’ fingers and square shape of the wrist. Furthermore, higher BMI values were confirmed to be predisposing factors in CTS occurrence.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to perform anthropometrical measurements of patients’ hands with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in order to evaluate if there is a correlation between CTS occurrence and hand features regarding sexual dimorphism, age and physical activity.

Materials and methods: Study sample consisted of 48 patients (33 females) and control group included 80 healthy volunteers (56 females) with no history of CTS. Following measurements were performed: the wrist circumference, length of the hand, the hand’s width, width of the wrist, thickness of the wrist, height of the hypothenar and thenar, length of the arm and forearm, circumference of the proximal phalanges and width of the digits; as well as several indexes were calculated i.e.: BMI, shape index, digit index, wrist index, hand length/height ratio (HLH-ratio) and hand length/upper limb length ratio (HLULL-ratio).

Results: Correlation coincidences were analyzed between circumferences within the hand, palm and body weight. All parameters except fingers were correlated with body weight in either gender in both groups (p<0.05; r=0.40-0.80); Furthermore, width of the hand was correlated with body height (p<0.001; r=0.56-0.71). Mean values of wrist index for CTS patients were: males: 0.8, females: 0.74 (significantly higher than in healthy individuals and indicating square shape); shape index: males: 76.5, females: 75.8; digit index: males: 55.7, females: 56.5. The calculated HLH-ratio in CTS group was: males: 10.6, females: 10.9; HLULL-ratio: males: 23.6, females: 24.9 and they did not differ significantly from healthy volunteers. Almost 90.0% of females with diagnosed CTS have BMI>25.0kg/m2.

Conclusions: There are significant differences in morphometrical features of the upper limbs between CTS patients and healthy individuals. Hands of patients with CTS are more massive and with ‘plumb’ fingers and square shape of the wrist. Furthermore, higher BMI values were confirmed to be predisposing factors in CTS occurrence.

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Keywords

carpal tunnel syndrome, anthropometry, risk factor, shape index, wrist, hand measurements

About this article
Title

Hand anthropometry in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a case-control study with a matched control group of healthy volunteers

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2018-05-17

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0049

Pubmed

29802717

Keywords

carpal tunnel syndrome
anthropometry
risk factor
shape index
wrist
hand measurements

Authors

Marek Trybus
Beata Stepańczak
Mateusz Koziej
Maksymilian Gniadek
Małgorzata Kołodziej
Mateusz Hołda

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