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Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-02-20
Submitted: 2018-01-08
Accepted: 2018-01-30
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Anatomy of the feeding arteries of the cerebral arteriovenous malformations

B. Milatović, J. Saponjski, H. Huseinagić, M. Moranjkić, S. Milošević Medenica, I. Marinković, I. Nikolić, S. Marinkovic
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0016
·
Pubmed: 29500892
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):656-669.

open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-02-20
Submitted: 2018-01-08
Accepted: 2018-01-30

Abstract

Background: Identification and anatomic features of the feeding arteries of the arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is very important due to neurologic, radiologic, and surgical reasons.

Materials and methods: Seventy-seven patients with AVMs were examined by using a digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) and computerised tomographic (CT) examination, including three-dimensional reconstruction of the brain vessels. In addition, the arteries of 4 human brain stems and 8 cerebral hemispheres were microdissected.

Results: The anatomic examination showed a sporadic hypoplasia, hyperplasia, early bifurcation and duplication of certain cerebral arteries. The perforating arteries varied from 1 to 8 in number. The features of the leptomeningeal and choroidal vessels were presented. The radiologic examination revealed singular (22.08%), double (32.48%) or multiple primary feeding arteries (45.45%), which were dilated and elongated in 58.44% of the patients. The feeders most often originated from the middle cerebral artery (MCA; (23.38%), less frequently from the anterior cerebral artery (ACA; 12.99%), and the posterior cerebral artery (PCA; 10.39%). Multiple feeders commonly originated from the ACA and MCA (11.69%), the MCA and PCA (10.39%), the ACA and PCA (7.79%), and the ACA, MCA and PCA (5.19%). The infratentorial feeders were found in 9.1% of the AVMs. Contribution from the middle meningeal and occipital arteries was seen in 3.9% angiograms. Two cerebral arteries had a saccular aneurysm. The AVM haemorrhage appeared in 63.6% of patients.

Conclusions: The knowledge of the origin and anatomic features of the AVMs feeders is important in the explanation of neurologic signs, and in a decision regarding the endovascular embolisation, neurosurgical and radiosurgical treatments.

Abstract

Background: Identification and anatomic features of the feeding arteries of the arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is very important due to neurologic, radiologic, and surgical reasons.

Materials and methods: Seventy-seven patients with AVMs were examined by using a digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) and computerised tomographic (CT) examination, including three-dimensional reconstruction of the brain vessels. In addition, the arteries of 4 human brain stems and 8 cerebral hemispheres were microdissected.

Results: The anatomic examination showed a sporadic hypoplasia, hyperplasia, early bifurcation and duplication of certain cerebral arteries. The perforating arteries varied from 1 to 8 in number. The features of the leptomeningeal and choroidal vessels were presented. The radiologic examination revealed singular (22.08%), double (32.48%) or multiple primary feeding arteries (45.45%), which were dilated and elongated in 58.44% of the patients. The feeders most often originated from the middle cerebral artery (MCA; (23.38%), less frequently from the anterior cerebral artery (ACA; 12.99%), and the posterior cerebral artery (PCA; 10.39%). Multiple feeders commonly originated from the ACA and MCA (11.69%), the MCA and PCA (10.39%), the ACA and PCA (7.79%), and the ACA, MCA and PCA (5.19%). The infratentorial feeders were found in 9.1% of the AVMs. Contribution from the middle meningeal and occipital arteries was seen in 3.9% angiograms. Two cerebral arteries had a saccular aneurysm. The AVM haemorrhage appeared in 63.6% of patients.

Conclusions: The knowledge of the origin and anatomic features of the AVMs feeders is important in the explanation of neurologic signs, and in a decision regarding the endovascular embolisation, neurosurgical and radiosurgical treatments.

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Keywords

angiography, arteriovenous malformations, cerebral arteries, feeding arteries, neuroanatomy, neuroradiology, neurosurgery

About this article
Title

Anatomy of the feeding arteries of the cerebral arteriovenous malformations

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)

Pages

656-669

Published online

2018-02-20

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0016

Pubmed

29500892

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):656-669.

Keywords

angiography
arteriovenous malformations
cerebral arteries
feeding arteries
neuroanatomy
neuroradiology
neurosurgery

Authors

B. Milatović
J. Saponjski
H. Huseinagić
M. Moranjkić
S. Milošević Medenica
I. Marinković
I. Nikolić
S. Marinkovic

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