open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2018-04-10
Submitted: 2017-12-29
Accepted: 2018-04-05
Get Citation

The plantaris muscle — rare relations to the neurovascular bundle in the popliteal fossa

Ł. Olewnik, M. Podgórski, M. Polguj, M. Topol
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0039
·
Pubmed: 29651792
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):785-788.

open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2018-04-10
Submitted: 2017-12-29
Accepted: 2018-04-05

Abstract

The plantaris muscle is characterised by morphological variability, both for origin and insertion, and may sometimes be absent. Its strength allows the ligament to be used for reconstruction of other tendons and ligaments. This report presents the rare placements and course of the plantaris muscle in relation to the neurovascular bundle. In this case, the hypertrophy of this muscle might cause pressure on the tibial nerve and produce symptoms similar to sciatica.

Abstract

The plantaris muscle is characterised by morphological variability, both for origin and insertion, and may sometimes be absent. Its strength allows the ligament to be used for reconstruction of other tendons and ligaments. This report presents the rare placements and course of the plantaris muscle in relation to the neurovascular bundle. In this case, the hypertrophy of this muscle might cause pressure on the tibial nerve and produce symptoms similar to sciatica.

Get Citation

Keywords

plantaris muscle, neurovascular bundle

About this article
Title

The plantaris muscle — rare relations to the neurovascular bundle in the popliteal fossa

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)

Pages

785-788

Published online

2018-04-10

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0039

Pubmed

29651792

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):785-788.

Keywords

plantaris muscle
neurovascular bundle

Authors

Ł. Olewnik
M. Podgórski
M. Polguj
M. Topol

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