open access

Vol 77, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-02-02
Submitted: 2017-12-13
Accepted: 2018-01-29
Get Citation

Using three-dimensional digital models to establish alveolar morphotype

M. Konvalinkova, W. Urbanova, K. Langova, M. Kotova
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0014
·
Pubmed: 29399755
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(3):536-542.

open access

Vol 77, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-02-02
Submitted: 2017-12-13
Accepted: 2018-01-29

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to propose a classification of alveolar morphotype and assess a relationship between extraction/non-extraction orthodontic treatment and changes to the alveolar process.
Materials and methods: Seventy-five subjects (mean age = 23.2, SD = 5.1) were selected. Areas of the sections of the alveolar process (ASAP) at three different levels (0, 2, and 4 mm) were measured on pre- and post-treatment three-dimensional digital models. Method reliability was analysed using Dahlberg’s formula, intraclass correlation coefficient, and paired t-tests.
Results: The mean ASAP was smallest at level 0 and largest at level 4. Pre-treatment ASAP < 773 mm2, < 863.9 mm2, and < 881.1 mm2 at levels 0, 2, and 4 mm, respectively, should be described as a “thin” alveolar morphotype. Regression models showed that pre-treatment ASAP was a predictor of the change of the alveolus during treatment only at level 2.
Conclusions: Patients for whom pre-treatment ASAP is < 773 mm2, < 863.9 mm2, and < 881.1 mm2 at levels 0, 2, and 4 mm, respectively, should be described as having a “thin” alveolar morphotype. In these patients, extraction treatment, associated with a decrease in the alveolus area, should be exercised with caution.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to propose a classification of alveolar morphotype and assess a relationship between extraction/non-extraction orthodontic treatment and changes to the alveolar process.
Materials and methods: Seventy-five subjects (mean age = 23.2, SD = 5.1) were selected. Areas of the sections of the alveolar process (ASAP) at three different levels (0, 2, and 4 mm) were measured on pre- and post-treatment three-dimensional digital models. Method reliability was analysed using Dahlberg’s formula, intraclass correlation coefficient, and paired t-tests.
Results: The mean ASAP was smallest at level 0 and largest at level 4. Pre-treatment ASAP < 773 mm2, < 863.9 mm2, and < 881.1 mm2 at levels 0, 2, and 4 mm, respectively, should be described as a “thin” alveolar morphotype. Regression models showed that pre-treatment ASAP was a predictor of the change of the alveolus during treatment only at level 2.
Conclusions: Patients for whom pre-treatment ASAP is < 773 mm2, < 863.9 mm2, and < 881.1 mm2 at levels 0, 2, and 4 mm, respectively, should be described as having a “thin” alveolar morphotype. In these patients, extraction treatment, associated with a decrease in the alveolus area, should be exercised with caution.

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Keywords

alveolar process; digital model; scanning

About this article
Title

Using three-dimensional digital models to establish alveolar morphotype

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 3 (2018)

Pages

536-542

Published online

2018-02-02

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0014

Pubmed

29399755

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(3):536-542.

Keywords

alveolar process
digital model
scanning

Authors

M. Konvalinkova
W. Urbanova
K. Langova
M. Kotova

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