open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-02-08
Submitted: 2017-11-01
Accepted: 2017-12-13
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Tensor fasciae latae muscle in human embryos and foetuses with special reference to its contribution to the development of the iliotibial tract

K.H. Cho, Z.W. Jin, H. Abe, J. Wilting, G. Murakami, J. F. Rodríguez-Vázquez
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0015
·
Pubmed: 29500891
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):703-710.

open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-02-08
Submitted: 2017-11-01
Accepted: 2017-12-13

Abstract

Background: The human tensor fasciae latae muscle (TFL) is inserted into the iliotibial tract and plays a critical role in lateral stabilisation of the hip joint. We previously described a candidate of the initial iliotibial tract that originated from the gluteus maximus muscle and extended distally.

Materials and methods: This study extended our observations by examining 30 human embryos and foetuses of gestational age (GA) 7–14 weeks (crown-to-rump length 24–108 mm). At GA 7 weeks, the TFL appeared as a small muscle mass floating in the subcutaneous tissue near the origins of the gluteus medius and rectus femoris muscles.


Results: Subsequently, the TFL obtained an iliac origin adjacent to the rectus femoris tendon, but the distal end remained a tiny fibrous mass on the vastus lateralis muscle. Until GA 10 weeks, the TFL muscle fibres were inserted into a vastus lateralis fascia that joined the quadriceps tendon distally. The next stage consisted of the TFL muscle belly “connecting” the vastus fascia and the gluteus fascia, including our previous candidate of the initial iliotibial tract. Until GA 14 weeks, the TFL was sandwiched by two laminae of the connecting fascia.

Conclusions: These findings suggested that, when the vastus lateralis fascia separated from the quadriceps tendon to attach to the tibia, possibly after birth, the resulting iliotibial tract would consist of a continuous longitudinal band from the gluteus maximus fascia, via the vastus fascia, to the tibia. Although it is a small muscle, the foetal TFL plays a critical role in the development of the iliotibial tract.

Abstract

Background: The human tensor fasciae latae muscle (TFL) is inserted into the iliotibial tract and plays a critical role in lateral stabilisation of the hip joint. We previously described a candidate of the initial iliotibial tract that originated from the gluteus maximus muscle and extended distally.

Materials and methods: This study extended our observations by examining 30 human embryos and foetuses of gestational age (GA) 7–14 weeks (crown-to-rump length 24–108 mm). At GA 7 weeks, the TFL appeared as a small muscle mass floating in the subcutaneous tissue near the origins of the gluteus medius and rectus femoris muscles.


Results: Subsequently, the TFL obtained an iliac origin adjacent to the rectus femoris tendon, but the distal end remained a tiny fibrous mass on the vastus lateralis muscle. Until GA 10 weeks, the TFL muscle fibres were inserted into a vastus lateralis fascia that joined the quadriceps tendon distally. The next stage consisted of the TFL muscle belly “connecting” the vastus fascia and the gluteus fascia, including our previous candidate of the initial iliotibial tract. Until GA 14 weeks, the TFL was sandwiched by two laminae of the connecting fascia.

Conclusions: These findings suggested that, when the vastus lateralis fascia separated from the quadriceps tendon to attach to the tibia, possibly after birth, the resulting iliotibial tract would consist of a continuous longitudinal band from the gluteus maximus fascia, via the vastus fascia, to the tibia. Although it is a small muscle, the foetal TFL plays a critical role in the development of the iliotibial tract.

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Keywords

tensor fasciae latae muscle, iliotibial tract, fascia lata, bipedal gait, human foetus

About this article
Title

Tensor fasciae latae muscle in human embryos and foetuses with special reference to its contribution to the development of the iliotibial tract

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)

Pages

703-710

Published online

2018-02-08

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0015

Pubmed

29500891

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):703-710.

Keywords

tensor fasciae latae muscle
iliotibial tract
fascia lata
bipedal gait
human foetus

Authors

K.H. Cho
Z.W. Jin
H. Abe
J. Wilting
G. Murakami
J. F. Rodríguez-Vázquez

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