open access

Vol 77, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-12-08
Submitted: 2017-10-21
Accepted: 2017-11-30
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Early life adversity induced third ventricular enlargement in young adult male patients suffered from major depressive disorder: a study of brain morphology

H. Zhao, T. Wei, X. Li, T. Ba
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0113
·
Pubmed: 29235089
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(3):428-433.

open access

Vol 77, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-12-08
Submitted: 2017-10-21
Accepted: 2017-11-30

Abstract

Background: Early life adversity (ELA) is not uncommon in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Childhood trauma has been reported more frequently in adult MDD patients relative to healthy controls. Recent researches have demonstrated that ELA could result in changes in brain morphology which might be an aetiological factor of MDD development.
Materials and methods: We recruited 40 young adult patients suffered from MDD and made computed tomography scan. Subjects were divided in two groups: MDD patients with ELA experience (E+D) vs. MDD patients without ELA
experience (E–D) according to Chinese version-Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). 17-item Hamilton Depression (HAMD) Scale and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) were also examined. Student’s t-test was used to compare the HAMD scores, NPI scores, CTQ subcomponents scores, third ventricular (TV) width and volume of patients from E+D and E–D groups.
Results: Findings demonstrated that ELA might result in TV enlargement; furthermore, there was a correlation between physical neglect and TV volume.
Conclusions: These findings supported the hypothesis that ELA could induce changes of structure around the TV, which might undermine the aetiology of MDD.

Abstract

Background: Early life adversity (ELA) is not uncommon in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Childhood trauma has been reported more frequently in adult MDD patients relative to healthy controls. Recent researches have demonstrated that ELA could result in changes in brain morphology which might be an aetiological factor of MDD development.
Materials and methods: We recruited 40 young adult patients suffered from MDD and made computed tomography scan. Subjects were divided in two groups: MDD patients with ELA experience (E+D) vs. MDD patients without ELA
experience (E–D) according to Chinese version-Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). 17-item Hamilton Depression (HAMD) Scale and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) were also examined. Student’s t-test was used to compare the HAMD scores, NPI scores, CTQ subcomponents scores, third ventricular (TV) width and volume of patients from E+D and E–D groups.
Results: Findings demonstrated that ELA might result in TV enlargement; furthermore, there was a correlation between physical neglect and TV volume.
Conclusions: These findings supported the hypothesis that ELA could induce changes of structure around the TV, which might undermine the aetiology of MDD.

Get Citation

Keywords

early life adversity; major depressive disorder; third ventricle; computed tomography scan

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About this article
Title

Early life adversity induced third ventricular enlargement in young adult male patients suffered from major depressive disorder: a study of brain morphology

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 3 (2018)

Pages

428-433

Published online

2017-12-08

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0113

Pubmed

29235089

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(3):428-433.

Keywords

early life adversity
major depressive disorder
third ventricle
computed tomography scan

Authors

H. Zhao
T. Wei
X. Li
T. Ba

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