open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-10-17
Submitted: 2017-09-20
Accepted: 2017-10-15
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Organisation of the dopamine neuronal subsets within midbrain of the feathertail glider (Acrobates pygmaeus, Acrobatidae, Marsupialia)

R. Krawczyk, I. Klejbor, K. Turlejski, B Ludkiewicz, J. Moryś
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0092
·
Pubmed: 29064551
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):558-567.

open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-10-17
Submitted: 2017-09-20
Accepted: 2017-10-15

Abstract

The Marsupial feathertail glider has a unique set of morphological, anatomical and behavioural features that make it a promising model for study of primate evolution. Among them it has many locomotor adaptations to arboreal life, such as diagonal gait of movements, gliding, fast climbing and running along branches. These ecological and behavioural specialisations could result in differences in anatomy of the brain systems involved in their integration. It is well acknowledged that dopaminergic neurons are involved in motor control, motivation and cognition. Due to the fact that there are no data on morphological organisation of dopaminergic system in the midbrain of this species, we decided to investigate it using immunohistochemical and quantitative methods. Our study showed that the general distribution and characteristics of the dopaminergic cells within midbrain nuclei of the pygmy acrobat is similar to that in other species, but it lack the substantia nigra compact part — ventral tier and “tail” of the substantia nigra subnuclei. This study provides the first description of the dopaminergic cells and nuclei in the midbrain of the feathertail glider and we hope it will start interest in the neurobiology of this species.

Abstract

The Marsupial feathertail glider has a unique set of morphological, anatomical and behavioural features that make it a promising model for study of primate evolution. Among them it has many locomotor adaptations to arboreal life, such as diagonal gait of movements, gliding, fast climbing and running along branches. These ecological and behavioural specialisations could result in differences in anatomy of the brain systems involved in their integration. It is well acknowledged that dopaminergic neurons are involved in motor control, motivation and cognition. Due to the fact that there are no data on morphological organisation of dopaminergic system in the midbrain of this species, we decided to investigate it using immunohistochemical and quantitative methods. Our study showed that the general distribution and characteristics of the dopaminergic cells within midbrain nuclei of the pygmy acrobat is similar to that in other species, but it lack the substantia nigra compact part — ventral tier and “tail” of the substantia nigra subnuclei. This study provides the first description of the dopaminergic cells and nuclei in the midbrain of the feathertail glider and we hope it will start interest in the neurobiology of this species.

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Keywords

feathertail glider, marsupial, dopaminergic neurons, midbrain nuclei, immunohistochemistry

About this article
Title

Organisation of the dopamine neuronal subsets within midbrain of the feathertail glider (Acrobates pygmaeus, Acrobatidae, Marsupialia)

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)

Pages

558-567

Published online

2017-10-17

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0092

Pubmed

29064551

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):558-567.

Keywords

feathertail glider
marsupial
dopaminergic neurons
midbrain nuclei
immunohistochemistry

Authors

R. Krawczyk
I. Klejbor
K. Turlejski
B Ludkiewicz
J. Moryś

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