open access

Vol 77, No 1 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-08-18
Submitted: 2017-07-09
Accepted: 2017-07-27
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The effect of anatomic differences on the relationship between renal artery and diaphragmatic crus

K. Esen, S. Tok, Yuksel Balci, F. D. Apaydin, E. Kara, D. Uzmansel
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0073
·
Pubmed: 28832087
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(1):22-28.

open access

Vol 77, No 1 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-08-18
Submitted: 2017-07-09
Accepted: 2017-07-27

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anatomic differences on the relationship between renal artery and diaphragmatic crus via the touch of two structures. Materials and methods: The study included dynamic computed tomography (CT) scans of 308 patients performed mainly for characterisation of liver and renal masses. Anatomic differences including the thickness of the diaphragmatic crus, the localisation of renal artery ostium at the wall of aorta, the level of renal artery origin with respect to superior mesenteric artery were evaluated. Statistical relationships between renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact and the anatomic differences were assessed.

Results: Thickness of the diaphragmatic crus at the level of renal artery origin exhibited a statistically significant relationship to renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact at the left (p < 0.001) and right side (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant relationship between high renal artery origin and renal artery- -diaphragmatic crus contact at the left (p < 0.001) and right side (p = 0.01). The localisation of renal artery ostium at the wall of aorta (right side, p = 0.436, left side, p = 0.681) did not demonstrate a relationship to renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact.

Conclusions: Thickness of the diaphragmatic crus and high renal artery origin with respect to superior mesenteric artery are crucial anatomic differences determining the relationship of renal artery and diaphragmatic crus. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 1: 22–28)  

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anatomic differences on the relationship between renal artery and diaphragmatic crus via the touch of two structures. Materials and methods: The study included dynamic computed tomography (CT) scans of 308 patients performed mainly for characterisation of liver and renal masses. Anatomic differences including the thickness of the diaphragmatic crus, the localisation of renal artery ostium at the wall of aorta, the level of renal artery origin with respect to superior mesenteric artery were evaluated. Statistical relationships between renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact and the anatomic differences were assessed.

Results: Thickness of the diaphragmatic crus at the level of renal artery origin exhibited a statistically significant relationship to renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact at the left (p < 0.001) and right side (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant relationship between high renal artery origin and renal artery- -diaphragmatic crus contact at the left (p < 0.001) and right side (p = 0.01). The localisation of renal artery ostium at the wall of aorta (right side, p = 0.436, left side, p = 0.681) did not demonstrate a relationship to renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact.

Conclusions: Thickness of the diaphragmatic crus and high renal artery origin with respect to superior mesenteric artery are crucial anatomic differences determining the relationship of renal artery and diaphragmatic crus. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 1: 22–28)  

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Keywords

entrapment, diaphragmatic crus, renal artery

About this article
Title

The effect of anatomic differences on the relationship between renal artery and diaphragmatic crus

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 1 (2018)

Pages

22-28

Published online

2017-08-18

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0073

Pubmed

28832087

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(1):22-28.

Keywords

entrapment
diaphragmatic crus
renal artery

Authors

K. Esen
S. Tok
Yuksel Balci
F. D. Apaydin
E. Kara
D. Uzmansel

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