open access

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-10-23
Submitted: 2017-06-07
Accepted: 2017-09-11
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The morphological characters of the male external genitalia of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus Europaeus)

G. Akbari, M. Babaei, N. Goodarzi
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0098
·
Pubmed: 29064545
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(2):293-300.

open access

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-10-23
Submitted: 2017-06-07
Accepted: 2017-09-11

Abstract

This study was conducted to depict anatomical characteristics of the penis of he­dgehog. Seven sexually mature male European hedgehogs were used. Following anaesthesia, the animals were scarified with chloroform inhalation. Gross penile characteristics such as length and diameter were thoroughly explored and measu­red using digital callipers. Tissue samples stained with haematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome for microscopic analysis. The penis of the European hedgehog was composed of a pair of corpus cavernosum penis and the glans penis without corpus spongiosum penis. The urethra at the end of penis, protruded as urethral process, on both sides of which two black nail-like structures, could be observed. The lower part was rounded forming a blind sac (sacculus urethralis) with a me­dian split below the urethra. Microscopically, the penile bulb lacked the corpus spongiosum penis, but, corpus spongiosum glans was seen at the beginning of the free part. In the European hedgehog, entirely stratified squamous epithelium of penile urethra, absence of corpus spongiosum penis around the urethra and bilateral urethral glands are basically different compared with other mammals. This information is expected to contribute to comparative penile morphology as well as for testing phylogenic hypotheses and expanding knowledge about reproductive biology in this animal. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 2: 293–300)

Abstract

This study was conducted to depict anatomical characteristics of the penis of he­dgehog. Seven sexually mature male European hedgehogs were used. Following anaesthesia, the animals were scarified with chloroform inhalation. Gross penile characteristics such as length and diameter were thoroughly explored and measu­red using digital callipers. Tissue samples stained with haematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome for microscopic analysis. The penis of the European hedgehog was composed of a pair of corpus cavernosum penis and the glans penis without corpus spongiosum penis. The urethra at the end of penis, protruded as urethral process, on both sides of which two black nail-like structures, could be observed. The lower part was rounded forming a blind sac (sacculus urethralis) with a me­dian split below the urethra. Microscopically, the penile bulb lacked the corpus spongiosum penis, but, corpus spongiosum glans was seen at the beginning of the free part. In the European hedgehog, entirely stratified squamous epithelium of penile urethra, absence of corpus spongiosum penis around the urethra and bilateral urethral glands are basically different compared with other mammals. This information is expected to contribute to comparative penile morphology as well as for testing phylogenic hypotheses and expanding knowledge about reproductive biology in this animal. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 2: 293–300)

Get Citation

Keywords

corpus spongiosum glans, European hedgehog, morphology, penis, urethra

About this article
Title

The morphological characters of the male external genitalia of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus Europaeus)

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)

Pages

293-300

Published online

2017-10-23

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0098

Pubmed

29064545

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(2):293-300.

Keywords

corpus spongiosum glans
European hedgehog
morphology
penis
urethra

Authors

G. Akbari
M. Babaei
N. Goodarzi

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