open access

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-10-17
Submitted: 2017-06-06
Accepted: 2017-09-04
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Process of neovascularisation compared with pain intensity in tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon associated with concomitant shoulder disorders, after arthroscopic treatment. Microscopic evaluation supported by immunohistochemical

J. Zabrzyński, Ł. Paczesny, Ł. Łapaj, D. Grzanka, J. Szukalski
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0093
·
Pubmed: 29064550
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(2):378-385.

open access

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-10-17
Submitted: 2017-06-06
Accepted: 2017-09-04

Abstract

Background: Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) is one of the most common, painful conditions of the anterior part of the shoulder and often coexists with rotator cuff tears. Multifactorial aetiopathology of tendi­nopathy is poorly understood; however, several studies indicated that it is seen predominantly in areas with decreased vascularity of the tissue; the pathology is also characterised by expansive and abundant neovascular in-growth. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the neovascularisation of proximal part of the LHBT and pain along the bicipital groove.

Materials and methods: Tissue material was obtained from 28 patients who underwent a shoulder arthroscopy and experienced pain along the bicipital groove measured using Visual-Analog Scale (VAS) score. CD31 and CD34 molecules were visualised by immunohistochemical method to assess biceps tendon neovascula­risation and quantify it based on a Bonar scoring system.

Results: Although all patients reported pain prior to arthroscopy (mean VAS score was 7.5), microscopic examination did not reveal neovascularisation in all cases. Immunohistochemical staining for CD31 and CD34 allowed for very precise visualisation and quantification of neovascularisation; however there was also no correlation between vessels in-growth scores and pain.

Conclusions: The obtained data suggest that neovascularisation process in tendino­pathy is not directly related to pain; however, further studies are needed to explain its significance in the LHBT tendinopathy. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 2: 378–385)

Abstract

Background: Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) is one of the most common, painful conditions of the anterior part of the shoulder and often coexists with rotator cuff tears. Multifactorial aetiopathology of tendi­nopathy is poorly understood; however, several studies indicated that it is seen predominantly in areas with decreased vascularity of the tissue; the pathology is also characterised by expansive and abundant neovascular in-growth. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the neovascularisation of proximal part of the LHBT and pain along the bicipital groove.

Materials and methods: Tissue material was obtained from 28 patients who underwent a shoulder arthroscopy and experienced pain along the bicipital groove measured using Visual-Analog Scale (VAS) score. CD31 and CD34 molecules were visualised by immunohistochemical method to assess biceps tendon neovascula­risation and quantify it based on a Bonar scoring system.

Results: Although all patients reported pain prior to arthroscopy (mean VAS score was 7.5), microscopic examination did not reveal neovascularisation in all cases. Immunohistochemical staining for CD31 and CD34 allowed for very precise visualisation and quantification of neovascularisation; however there was also no correlation between vessels in-growth scores and pain.

Conclusions: The obtained data suggest that neovascularisation process in tendino­pathy is not directly related to pain; however, further studies are needed to explain its significance in the LHBT tendinopathy. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 2: 378–385)

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Keywords

neovascularisation, biceps tendinopathy, tendinopathy, CD31, CD34, immunohistochemical

About this article
Title

Process of neovascularisation compared with pain intensity in tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon associated with concomitant shoulder disorders, after arthroscopic treatment. Microscopic evaluation supported by immunohistochemical

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)

Pages

378-385

Published online

2017-10-17

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0093

Pubmed

29064550

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(2):378-385.

Keywords

neovascularisation
biceps tendinopathy
tendinopathy
CD31
CD34
immunohistochemical

Authors

J. Zabrzyński
Ł. Paczesny
Ł. Łapaj
D. Grzanka
J. Szukalski

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