open access

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-09-29
Submitted: 2017-04-30
Accepted: 2017-09-20
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The comparative anatomy of the folds, fossae, and adhesions around the duodenojejunal flexure in mammals

M. Ishida, N. Sakata, I. Ise, T. Ono, M. Shimura, K. Ishii, M. Murakami, T. Takadate, T. Aoki, K. Kudo, S. Ohnuma, K. Fukase, H. Ohtsuka, M. Mizuma, H. Hayashi, K. Nakagawa, T. Morikawa, F. Motoi, T. Naitoh, M. Unno
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0089
·
Pubmed: 29064554
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(2):286-292.

open access

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-09-29
Submitted: 2017-04-30
Accepted: 2017-09-20

Abstract

Background: Anatomical knowledge of the duodenojejunal flexure is necessary for abdominal surgeries, and also important for physiologic studies about the duodenum. But little is known about the anatomy of this region in mammals. Here, we examined comparative anatomy to understand the anatomical formation of the duodenojejunal flexure in mammals.

Materials and methods: The areas around the duonenojejunal flexure were ob­served in mouse, rat, dog, pig, and human, and the anatomical structures around the duodenojejunal junction in the animals were compared with those in human.

Results: The superior and inferior duodenal folds, and the superior and inferior duodenal fossae were identified in all examined humans. In pig, the structures were not clearly identified because the duodenum strongly adhered to the retroperitoneum and to the mesocolon. In mouse, rat, and dog, only the plica duodenocolica, which is regarded as the animal counterpart of the superior duo­denal fold in human, was identified, and other folds or fossae were not observed, probably because the duodenum was not fixed to the parietal peritoneum in those animals. Transection of the plica duodenocolica could return the normally rotated intestine back to the state of non-rotation in rat.

Conclusions: This study showed the anatomical similarities and dissimilarities of the duodenojejunal flexure among the mammals. Anatomical knowledge of the area is useful for duodenal and pancreatic surgeries, and for animal studies about the duodenum. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 2: 286–292)

Abstract

Background: Anatomical knowledge of the duodenojejunal flexure is necessary for abdominal surgeries, and also important for physiologic studies about the duodenum. But little is known about the anatomy of this region in mammals. Here, we examined comparative anatomy to understand the anatomical formation of the duodenojejunal flexure in mammals.

Materials and methods: The areas around the duonenojejunal flexure were ob­served in mouse, rat, dog, pig, and human, and the anatomical structures around the duodenojejunal junction in the animals were compared with those in human.

Results: The superior and inferior duodenal folds, and the superior and inferior duodenal fossae were identified in all examined humans. In pig, the structures were not clearly identified because the duodenum strongly adhered to the retroperitoneum and to the mesocolon. In mouse, rat, and dog, only the plica duodenocolica, which is regarded as the animal counterpart of the superior duo­denal fold in human, was identified, and other folds or fossae were not observed, probably because the duodenum was not fixed to the parietal peritoneum in those animals. Transection of the plica duodenocolica could return the normally rotated intestine back to the state of non-rotation in rat.

Conclusions: This study showed the anatomical similarities and dissimilarities of the duodenojejunal flexure among the mammals. Anatomical knowledge of the area is useful for duodenal and pancreatic surgeries, and for animal studies about the duodenum. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 2: 286–292)

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Keywords

duodenojejunal flexure, flexura duodenojejunalis, duodenal fossa, plica duodenocolica, suspensory muscle of the duodenum, and superior duodenal fold

About this article
Title

The comparative anatomy of the folds, fossae, and adhesions around the duodenojejunal flexure in mammals

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 2 (2018)

Pages

286-292

Published online

2017-09-29

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0089

Pubmed

29064554

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(2):286-292.

Keywords

duodenojejunal flexure
flexura duodenojejunalis
duodenal fossa
plica duodenocolica
suspensory muscle of the duodenum
and superior duodenal fold

Authors

M. Ishida
N. Sakata
I. Ise
T. Ono
M. Shimura
K. Ishii
M. Murakami
T. Takadate
T. Aoki
K. Kudo
S. Ohnuma
K. Fukase
H. Ohtsuka
M. Mizuma
H. Hayashi
K. Nakagawa
T. Morikawa
F. Motoi
T. Naitoh
M. Unno

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