open access

Vol 77, No 1 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-06-14
Submitted: 2017-04-10
Accepted: 2017-04-27
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Volumetric evaluation of temporal bone structures in the cases with bilateral tinnitus: clinical and morphometrical study

N. Gocmen-Mas, O. Kahveci, S. Lafcı Fahrioğlu, N. Okur, S. Canan, N. Demirci Yonguc, O. Özel, S. Karabekir
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0057
·
Pubmed: 28653305
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(1):57-64.

open access

Vol 77, No 1 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-06-14
Submitted: 2017-04-10
Accepted: 2017-04-27

Abstract

Background: Tinnitus is the recognition of sound in the absence of any external auditory stimulus to the noise of ringing in the ears. Middle ear aeration carries important role for ossicular coupling and normal hearing. There is restricted morphometric data on the cases with bilateral tinnitus. Materials and methods: In this study we evaluated hearing findings of 18 cases with subjective nonpulsatile bilateral tinnitus and also morphometry and volumetry of temporal bone substructures on the computed tomography images using stereological method compared with the gender and age matched 12 healthy subjects. Duration of tinnitus, exposing acoustic trauma or/and high level noise levels, evaluation of middle ear volume, jugular bulb levels, distances between jugular bulb and both oval window and middle ear were evaluated. Results: Both males and females with tinnitus showed worse hearing thresholds through bone and air conductions than healthy subjects but it was not statistically significant. Pure tone thresholds through bone and air conductions were not statistically different in both sexes with bilateral tinnitus. Right middle ear volume of the cases with bilateral tinnitus was mean 5.57 cm3 for males and 5.64 cm3 for females; and also the left middle ear volume of the cases with bilateral tinnitus was mean 5.87 cm3 for males and 5.65 cm3 for females. There were no significant differences between the cases with bilateral tinnitus and the control subjects according to the side of the body. < strong > Conclusions: The data on the hearing findings and morphometrical evaluation of the cases with bilateral tinnitus may be important for anatomists and clinicians. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 1: 57–64)  

Abstract

Background: Tinnitus is the recognition of sound in the absence of any external auditory stimulus to the noise of ringing in the ears. Middle ear aeration carries important role for ossicular coupling and normal hearing. There is restricted morphometric data on the cases with bilateral tinnitus. Materials and methods: In this study we evaluated hearing findings of 18 cases with subjective nonpulsatile bilateral tinnitus and also morphometry and volumetry of temporal bone substructures on the computed tomography images using stereological method compared with the gender and age matched 12 healthy subjects. Duration of tinnitus, exposing acoustic trauma or/and high level noise levels, evaluation of middle ear volume, jugular bulb levels, distances between jugular bulb and both oval window and middle ear were evaluated. Results: Both males and females with tinnitus showed worse hearing thresholds through bone and air conductions than healthy subjects but it was not statistically significant. Pure tone thresholds through bone and air conductions were not statistically different in both sexes with bilateral tinnitus. Right middle ear volume of the cases with bilateral tinnitus was mean 5.57 cm3 for males and 5.64 cm3 for females; and also the left middle ear volume of the cases with bilateral tinnitus was mean 5.87 cm3 for males and 5.65 cm3 for females. There were no significant differences between the cases with bilateral tinnitus and the control subjects according to the side of the body. < strong > Conclusions: The data on the hearing findings and morphometrical evaluation of the cases with bilateral tinnitus may be important for anatomists and clinicians. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 1: 57–64)  

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Keywords

bilateral tinnitus, temporal bone, computed tomography, stereology, clinical evaluation

About this article
Title

Volumetric evaluation of temporal bone structures in the cases with bilateral tinnitus: clinical and morphometrical study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 1 (2018)

Pages

57-64

Published online

2017-06-14

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0057

Pubmed

28653305

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(1):57-64.

Keywords

bilateral tinnitus
temporal bone
computed tomography
stereology
clinical evaluation

Authors

N. Gocmen-Mas
O. Kahveci
S. Lafcı Fahrioğlu
N. Okur
S. Canan
N. Demirci Yonguc
O. Özel
S. Karabekir

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