open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-04-19
Submitted: 2017-02-21
Accepted: 2017-04-11
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Endothelial progenitor cells populate the stromal stem niche of tympanum

M. C. Rusu, V. S. Mănoiu, V. M. Popescu, R. C. Ciuluvică
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0038
·
Pubmed: 28553861
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):630-634.

open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-04-19
Submitted: 2017-02-21
Accepted: 2017-04-11

Abstract

The tympanic membrane (TM) integrity is of utmost importance for the sense of hearing. Therefore, the intrinsic potential of the TM to regenerate and repair deserves complete characterisation. Existing studies brought evidence on the epithelial stem niche of the TM. However, the stromal compartment was not evaluated for harbouring a distinctive stem, or progenitor, niche. We aimed doing this in transmission electron microscopy. We used TMs dissected out from 3 male Oryctolagus cuniculus rabbits. Evidence of stromal quiescent stem cells was gathered. Moreover, endothelial progenitor cells were found in the TM, being accurately identified by two specific ultrastructural markers of the endothelial lineage: the Weibel-Palade bodies and the stomatal diaphragms of the subplasmalemmal caveolae. The stromal stem niche of the TM appears to be a distinctive contributor during physiological and pathological processes of the TM, such as cholesteatoma formation, at least as a biological support for processes of vasculogenesis. However, further characterisation of the molecular pattern of the stromal stem niche of the TM is mandatory.

Abstract

The tympanic membrane (TM) integrity is of utmost importance for the sense of hearing. Therefore, the intrinsic potential of the TM to regenerate and repair deserves complete characterisation. Existing studies brought evidence on the epithelial stem niche of the TM. However, the stromal compartment was not evaluated for harbouring a distinctive stem, or progenitor, niche. We aimed doing this in transmission electron microscopy. We used TMs dissected out from 3 male Oryctolagus cuniculus rabbits. Evidence of stromal quiescent stem cells was gathered. Moreover, endothelial progenitor cells were found in the TM, being accurately identified by two specific ultrastructural markers of the endothelial lineage: the Weibel-Palade bodies and the stomatal diaphragms of the subplasmalemmal caveolae. The stromal stem niche of the TM appears to be a distinctive contributor during physiological and pathological processes of the TM, such as cholesteatoma formation, at least as a biological support for processes of vasculogenesis. However, further characterisation of the molecular pattern of the stromal stem niche of the TM is mandatory.

Get Citation

Keywords

ear, caveolae, Weibel-Palade body, endothelial progenitor cells, stem cells

About this article
Title

Endothelial progenitor cells populate the stromal stem niche of tympanum

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)

Pages

630-634

Published online

2017-04-19

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0038

Pubmed

28553861

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):630-634.

Keywords

ear
caveolae
Weibel-Palade body
endothelial progenitor cells
stem cells

Authors

M. C. Rusu
V. S. Mănoiu
V. M. Popescu
R. C. Ciuluvică

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