open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-05-15
Submitted: 2017-02-17
Accepted: 2017-05-01
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Characteristics of yak platelet derived growth factors-alpha gene and its expression in brain tissues

Z. Huang, Y. Pan, P. Liu, S. Yu, Y. Cui
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0045
·
Pubmed: 28553854
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):551-557.

open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-05-15
Submitted: 2017-02-17
Accepted: 2017-05-01

Abstract

Background: Platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) are key components of autocrine and paracrine signalling, both of which play important roles in mammalian developmental processes. PDGF expression levels also relate to oxygen levels. The characteristics of yak PDGFs, which are indigenous to hypoxic environments, have not been clearly described until the current study.

Materials and methods: We amplified the open reading frame encoding yak (Bos grunniens) platelet derived growth factor-alpha (PDGFA) from a yak skin tissue cDNA library by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers and Sanger dideoxy sequencing. Expression of PDGFA mRNA in different portions of yak brain tissue (cerebrum, cerebellum, hippocampus, and spinal cord) was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). PDGFA protein expression levels and its location in different portions of the yak brain were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry.

Results: We obtained a yak PDGFA 755 bp cDNA gene fragment containing a 636 bp open reading frame, encoding 211 amino acids (GenBank: KU851801). Phylogenetic analysis shows yak PDGFA to be well conserved, having 98.1% DNA sequence identity to homologous Bubalus bubalus and Bos taurus PDGFA genes. However, 8 nucleotides in the yak DNA sequence and 4 amino acids in the yak protein sequence differ from the other two species. PDGFA is widely expressed in yak brain tissue, and furthermore, PDGFA expression in the cerebrum and cerebellum are higher than in the hippocampus and spinal cord (p > 0.05). PDGFA was observed by immunohistochemistry in glial cells of the cerebrum, cerebellum, and hippocampus, as well as in pyramidal cells of the cerebrum, and Purkinje cell bodies of the hippocampus, but not in glial cells of the spinal cord.

Conclusions: The PDGFA gene is well conserved in the animal kingdom; however, the yak PDGFA gene has unique characteristics and brain expression patterns specific to this high elevation species.

Abstract

Background: Platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) are key components of autocrine and paracrine signalling, both of which play important roles in mammalian developmental processes. PDGF expression levels also relate to oxygen levels. The characteristics of yak PDGFs, which are indigenous to hypoxic environments, have not been clearly described until the current study.

Materials and methods: We amplified the open reading frame encoding yak (Bos grunniens) platelet derived growth factor-alpha (PDGFA) from a yak skin tissue cDNA library by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers and Sanger dideoxy sequencing. Expression of PDGFA mRNA in different portions of yak brain tissue (cerebrum, cerebellum, hippocampus, and spinal cord) was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). PDGFA protein expression levels and its location in different portions of the yak brain were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry.

Results: We obtained a yak PDGFA 755 bp cDNA gene fragment containing a 636 bp open reading frame, encoding 211 amino acids (GenBank: KU851801). Phylogenetic analysis shows yak PDGFA to be well conserved, having 98.1% DNA sequence identity to homologous Bubalus bubalus and Bos taurus PDGFA genes. However, 8 nucleotides in the yak DNA sequence and 4 amino acids in the yak protein sequence differ from the other two species. PDGFA is widely expressed in yak brain tissue, and furthermore, PDGFA expression in the cerebrum and cerebellum are higher than in the hippocampus and spinal cord (p > 0.05). PDGFA was observed by immunohistochemistry in glial cells of the cerebrum, cerebellum, and hippocampus, as well as in pyramidal cells of the cerebrum, and Purkinje cell bodies of the hippocampus, but not in glial cells of the spinal cord.

Conclusions: The PDGFA gene is well conserved in the animal kingdom; however, the yak PDGFA gene has unique characteristics and brain expression patterns specific to this high elevation species.

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Keywords

yak, platelet derived growth factor-alpha, expression, brain

About this article
Title

Characteristics of yak platelet derived growth factors-alpha gene and its expression in brain tissues

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)

Pages

551-557

Published online

2017-05-15

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0045

Pubmed

28553854

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):551-557.

Keywords

yak
platelet derived growth factor-alpha
expression
brain

Authors

Z. Huang
Y. Pan
P. Liu
S. Yu
Y. Cui

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