open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-05-25
Submitted: 2017-02-17
Accepted: 2017-05-15
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Effect of subchronic intake of green tea extract on liver of albino rat histomorphometric, ultrastructural and biochemical study

S. M. Zaki, S. H. Ahmed, W. M. Sayed, A. A. Ali
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0050
·
Pubmed: 28553849
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):642-649.

open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-05-25
Submitted: 2017-02-17
Accepted: 2017-05-15

Abstract

Background: There are conflicting reports on the effect of green tea extract (GTE) on the liver of animals. Some studies failed to show any adverse hepatic effects following administration of GTE to mice, rats, and dogs. Others reported severe hepatic necrosis, resulting in death in female Swiss-Webster mice following its administration. The aim of the study was to examine the subchronic toxicity of GTE on the liver of the adult male albino rats.

Materials and methods: Forty male adult Wistar albino rats were used in the study. The rats were divided into four groups; group I (control), group II (low-dose green tea), group III (medium-dose green tea) and group IV (high-dose green tea). Histological, biochemical and histomorphometric analyses were done.

Results: Mild hepatic affections were observed in group II. The affections were severe in groups III and IV. The central veins and hepatic sinusoids were congested. The hepatocytes were degenerated. Hypertrophy of the hepatic arteries, dilation of the bile ducts and cellular infiltration were clearly observed in the last two groups. Mild degenerative changes were observed in the hepatocytes in rat’s group II; the cytoplasm was rarefied and vacuolated. Some mitochondria were ruptured. The blood sinusoids were congested. The rough endoplasmic retinaculum was fragmented in group III. More degenerative changes were observed in group IV; the hepatic architectures were lost with disruption of cell membranes. Most of the cell organelles were degenerated and most of mitochondria were ballooned. As compared to that of the control groups: the total serum protein values in groups II, III and IV showed a statistically significant decrease (12%, 20% and 21%, respectively), the mean area per cent of collagen fibres in groups III and IV increased 5 and 7 folds.

Conclusions: Subchronic administration of GTE resulted in structural and functional affection of the rats’ liver. The dose of 250 mg/kg/day seemed to be safe, while the doses of 500 mg/kg/day and 1000 mg/kg/day had deleterious effect being more evident in the latter dose.

Abstract

Background: There are conflicting reports on the effect of green tea extract (GTE) on the liver of animals. Some studies failed to show any adverse hepatic effects following administration of GTE to mice, rats, and dogs. Others reported severe hepatic necrosis, resulting in death in female Swiss-Webster mice following its administration. The aim of the study was to examine the subchronic toxicity of GTE on the liver of the adult male albino rats.

Materials and methods: Forty male adult Wistar albino rats were used in the study. The rats were divided into four groups; group I (control), group II (low-dose green tea), group III (medium-dose green tea) and group IV (high-dose green tea). Histological, biochemical and histomorphometric analyses were done.

Results: Mild hepatic affections were observed in group II. The affections were severe in groups III and IV. The central veins and hepatic sinusoids were congested. The hepatocytes were degenerated. Hypertrophy of the hepatic arteries, dilation of the bile ducts and cellular infiltration were clearly observed in the last two groups. Mild degenerative changes were observed in the hepatocytes in rat’s group II; the cytoplasm was rarefied and vacuolated. Some mitochondria were ruptured. The blood sinusoids were congested. The rough endoplasmic retinaculum was fragmented in group III. More degenerative changes were observed in group IV; the hepatic architectures were lost with disruption of cell membranes. Most of the cell organelles were degenerated and most of mitochondria were ballooned. As compared to that of the control groups: the total serum protein values in groups II, III and IV showed a statistically significant decrease (12%, 20% and 21%, respectively), the mean area per cent of collagen fibres in groups III and IV increased 5 and 7 folds.

Conclusions: Subchronic administration of GTE resulted in structural and functional affection of the rats’ liver. The dose of 250 mg/kg/day seemed to be safe, while the doses of 500 mg/kg/day and 1000 mg/kg/day had deleterious effect being more evident in the latter dose.

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Keywords

green tea extract, liver

About this article
Title

Effect of subchronic intake of green tea extract on liver of albino rat histomorphometric, ultrastructural and biochemical study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)

Pages

642-649

Published online

2017-05-25

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0050

Pubmed

28553849

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):642-649.

Keywords

green tea extract
liver

Authors

S. M. Zaki
S. H. Ahmed
W. M. Sayed
A. A. Ali

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