open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-04-26
Submitted: 2017-02-16
Accepted: 2017-04-11
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The relationship between selected parameters of a cephalometric analysis determining the vertical morphology of facial skeleton and bite force

J. Szymańska, Ł. Sidorowicz
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0040
·
Pubmed: 28553859
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):736-741.

open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-04-26
Submitted: 2017-02-16
Accepted: 2017-04-11

Abstract

Background: There are few studies devoted to an assessment of the relation between bite force and detailed results of cephalometric analysis that determine craniofacial structure. The purpose of the study was to assess the correlation between the selected criteria determining the craniofacial structure and bite force in patients with normal and increased vertical relation of the bases of jaws and skull.

Materials and methods: The study material included 120 patients, aged between 7 and 17 years, who presented for examination and possible orthodontic treatment. The patients were divided into a study group and a control group. The basis of this division were ML-NL and ML-NSL angles, according to Segner’s and Hasund’s analysis standards, respectively: above 27° and above 30° in the study group, and 20.0 ± 7.0° and 28.0 ± 5.0° in the control group. Bite force was tested using a digital dynamometer calibrated in Newtons. The measurement was performed at the level of the first permanent molars. Vertical relations were assessed using the following cephalometric measurements: ML-NSL, ML-NL, NL-NSL, N-Me, Sp-Me, SpMe:NMe, ms-NL, SGo:NMe.

Results: Bite force was not found to be dependent on the lower anterior face height (Sp-Me), the ratio of anterior lower to total anterior face height (SpMe:NMe), and NL-NSL angle both in patients with abnormal and normal relations of bases of jaws and skull. Although statistically non-significant, the average mean and maximum bite force values were found to be lower in patients with high-angle relation of bases of jaws and skull than in subjects with normal relation of bases of jaws and skull.

Conclusions: Among the selected parameters determining the vertical craniofacial structure, the rear height of the alveolar process (ms-NL) exerts the greatest influence on bite force in both patients with increased and normal vertical relation of bases of jaws and skull, and with an increase in the value of ms-NL, bite force is reduced.  

Abstract

Background: There are few studies devoted to an assessment of the relation between bite force and detailed results of cephalometric analysis that determine craniofacial structure. The purpose of the study was to assess the correlation between the selected criteria determining the craniofacial structure and bite force in patients with normal and increased vertical relation of the bases of jaws and skull.

Materials and methods: The study material included 120 patients, aged between 7 and 17 years, who presented for examination and possible orthodontic treatment. The patients were divided into a study group and a control group. The basis of this division were ML-NL and ML-NSL angles, according to Segner’s and Hasund’s analysis standards, respectively: above 27° and above 30° in the study group, and 20.0 ± 7.0° and 28.0 ± 5.0° in the control group. Bite force was tested using a digital dynamometer calibrated in Newtons. The measurement was performed at the level of the first permanent molars. Vertical relations were assessed using the following cephalometric measurements: ML-NSL, ML-NL, NL-NSL, N-Me, Sp-Me, SpMe:NMe, ms-NL, SGo:NMe.

Results: Bite force was not found to be dependent on the lower anterior face height (Sp-Me), the ratio of anterior lower to total anterior face height (SpMe:NMe), and NL-NSL angle both in patients with abnormal and normal relations of bases of jaws and skull. Although statistically non-significant, the average mean and maximum bite force values were found to be lower in patients with high-angle relation of bases of jaws and skull than in subjects with normal relation of bases of jaws and skull.

Conclusions: Among the selected parameters determining the vertical craniofacial structure, the rear height of the alveolar process (ms-NL) exerts the greatest influence on bite force in both patients with increased and normal vertical relation of bases of jaws and skull, and with an increase in the value of ms-NL, bite force is reduced.  

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Keywords

facial morphology, long face, bite force, cephalometric analysis

About this article
Title

The relationship between selected parameters of a cephalometric analysis determining the vertical morphology of facial skeleton and bite force

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)

Pages

736-741

Published online

2017-04-26

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0040

Pubmed

28553859

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):736-741.

Keywords

facial morphology
long face
bite force
cephalometric analysis

Authors

J. Szymańska
Ł. Sidorowicz

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