open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-05-15
Submitted: 2017-01-26
Accepted: 2017-04-11
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Histomorphometric study of the effect of methionine on small intestine parameters in rat: an applied histologic study

S. Seyyedin, M. N. Nazem
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0044
·
Pubmed: 28553855
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):620-629.

open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-05-15
Submitted: 2017-01-26
Accepted: 2017-04-11

Abstract

Background: Assessment of morphological changes has more often been used in the diagnosis and assessment of intestinal pathology and development. Since methionine is widely used in nutritional and sports supplements and also there is not enough information about the effect of this amino acid on the gastrointestinal histomorphometry, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of methionine on the small intestine histomorphometry.

Materials and methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided to three equal groups. Two treatment groups received 100 and 200 mg/kg L-methionine solution respectively via intraperitoneal injection while the control group received normal saline. On day 21, all rats were euthanised and segments from three parts of small intestine were taken to histomorphometrical study. Paraffin sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, alcian blue (AB) and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) methods separately. In order to analyse histomorphometric features of each segment, villus height, width, area, crypt depth, villus height to crypt depth ratio, goblet cell number, and muscle layer thickness were measured.

Results and conclusions: Obtained results revealed that methionine may change the histomorphometric parameters of small intestine.

Abstract

Background: Assessment of morphological changes has more often been used in the diagnosis and assessment of intestinal pathology and development. Since methionine is widely used in nutritional and sports supplements and also there is not enough information about the effect of this amino acid on the gastrointestinal histomorphometry, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of methionine on the small intestine histomorphometry.

Materials and methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided to three equal groups. Two treatment groups received 100 and 200 mg/kg L-methionine solution respectively via intraperitoneal injection while the control group received normal saline. On day 21, all rats were euthanised and segments from three parts of small intestine were taken to histomorphometrical study. Paraffin sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, alcian blue (AB) and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) methods separately. In order to analyse histomorphometric features of each segment, villus height, width, area, crypt depth, villus height to crypt depth ratio, goblet cell number, and muscle layer thickness were measured.

Results and conclusions: Obtained results revealed that methionine may change the histomorphometric parameters of small intestine.

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Keywords

histomorphometry, small intestine, methionine, rat

About this article
Title

Histomorphometric study of the effect of methionine on small intestine parameters in rat: an applied histologic study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)

Pages

620-629

Published online

2017-05-15

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0044

Pubmed

28553855

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):620-629.

Keywords

histomorphometry
small intestine
methionine
rat

Authors

S. Seyyedin
M. N. Nazem

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