open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-03-24
Submitted: 2016-12-30
Accepted: 2017-02-07
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Stroke Bricks — spatial brain regions to assess ischaemic stroke localisation

B. Ciszek, R. Jóźwiak, E. Sobieszczuk, A. Przelaskowski, T. Skadorwa
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0029
·
Pubmed: 28353303
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):568-573.

open access

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-03-24
Submitted: 2016-12-30
Accepted: 2017-02-07

Abstract

Computer-aided analysis of non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) images for rapid diagnosis of ischaemic stroke is based on the augmented visualisation of evolving ischaemic lesions. Computerised support of NCCT often leads to overinterpretation of ischaemic areas, thus it is of great interest to provide neurologically verified regions in order to improve accuracy of subsequent radiological assessment. We propose Stroke Bricks (StBr) as an arbitrary spatial division of brain tissue into the regions associated with specific clinical symptoms of ischaemic stroke. Neurological stroke deficit is formally translated into respective areas of possible ischaemic lesions. StBr were designed according to formalised mapping of neurological symptoms and were attributed to the uniquely defined areas of impaired blood supply. StBr concept may be useful for an integrated radiological CT-based assessment of suspected stroke cases or can be included into computer-aided tools to optimise the evaluation of stroke site and its extent. These data in turn are appropriable for further diagnosis, predicting the therapeutic outcome as well as for patients’ qualification for an appropriate form of reperfusion therapy. The usefulness of StBr was illustrated in the case studies.

Abstract

Computer-aided analysis of non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) images for rapid diagnosis of ischaemic stroke is based on the augmented visualisation of evolving ischaemic lesions. Computerised support of NCCT often leads to overinterpretation of ischaemic areas, thus it is of great interest to provide neurologically verified regions in order to improve accuracy of subsequent radiological assessment. We propose Stroke Bricks (StBr) as an arbitrary spatial division of brain tissue into the regions associated with specific clinical symptoms of ischaemic stroke. Neurological stroke deficit is formally translated into respective areas of possible ischaemic lesions. StBr were designed according to formalised mapping of neurological symptoms and were attributed to the uniquely defined areas of impaired blood supply. StBr concept may be useful for an integrated radiological CT-based assessment of suspected stroke cases or can be included into computer-aided tools to optimise the evaluation of stroke site and its extent. These data in turn are appropriable for further diagnosis, predicting the therapeutic outcome as well as for patients’ qualification for an appropriate form of reperfusion therapy. The usefulness of StBr was illustrated in the case studies.

Get Citation

Keywords

cerebral arteries, stroke, ischaemic stroke, brain ischaemia, cerebral haemorrhage, computed tomography

About this article
Title

Stroke Bricks — spatial brain regions to assess ischaemic stroke localisation

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 4 (2017)

Pages

568-573

Published online

2017-03-24

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0029

Pubmed

28353303

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(4):568-573.

Keywords

cerebral arteries
stroke
ischaemic stroke
brain ischaemia
cerebral haemorrhage
computed tomography

Authors

B. Ciszek
R. Jóźwiak
E. Sobieszczuk
A. Przelaskowski
T. Skadorwa

References (11)
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