open access

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-02-10
Submitted: 2016-12-28
Accepted: 2017-01-30
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Tongue and lingual salivary glands of the canary: scanning electron microscopy and histochemical study

F. Başak, Ş. H. Atalgin, E. Ü. Bozkurt
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0014
·
Pubmed: 28198526
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(3):348-354.

open access

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-02-10
Submitted: 2016-12-28
Accepted: 2017-01-30

Abstract

In this study, morphological characteristics of the canary tongue were examined macroscopically and histologically besides using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, histochemical features of the lingual salivary glands of the canary were also examined. The results suggest that the tongue of the canary has an equilateral quadrangle shape is sloped towards the apex on its dorsal surface; where its sides are bounded by tall epithelial extensions. Additionally, histological examination showed that salivary glands were only present on the body of the tongue and there were no taste buds. However, the tongue has mechanical sen­sory cell groups in its subepithelial connective tissue. Histochemical examination, demonstrated that the salivary gland epithelial cells contained carbohydrates which were composed of acidic sialo-mucins.

Abstract

In this study, morphological characteristics of the canary tongue were examined macroscopically and histologically besides using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, histochemical features of the lingual salivary glands of the canary were also examined. The results suggest that the tongue of the canary has an equilateral quadrangle shape is sloped towards the apex on its dorsal surface; where its sides are bounded by tall epithelial extensions. Additionally, histological examination showed that salivary glands were only present on the body of the tongue and there were no taste buds. However, the tongue has mechanical sen­sory cell groups in its subepithelial connective tissue. Histochemical examination, demonstrated that the salivary gland epithelial cells contained carbohydrates which were composed of acidic sialo-mucins.

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Keywords

canary, tongue, surface morphology, scanning electron microscopy, lingual salivary glands, histochemistry

About this article
Title

Tongue and lingual salivary glands of the canary: scanning electron microscopy and histochemical study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)

Pages

348-354

Published online

2017-02-10

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0014

Pubmed

28198526

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(3):348-354.

Keywords

canary
tongue
surface morphology
scanning electron microscopy
lingual salivary glands
histochemistry

Authors

F. Başak
Ş. H. Atalgin
E. Ü. Bozkurt

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