open access

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-02-14
Submitted: 2016-11-02
Accepted: 2017-01-21
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Coexistence of bicuspid aortic valve, aberrant right subclavian artery and common origin of carotid arteries

P. Tyczyński, I. Michałowska, A. Fronczak, R. Wolny, H. Łazarczyk, S. Kocańda, Z. Chmielak, A. Witkowski
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2017.0015
·
Pubmed: 28198527
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(3):414-419.

open access

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-02-14
Submitted: 2016-11-02
Accepted: 2017-01-21

Abstract

Background: Prevalence of bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and right aberrant sub-clavian artery (ASA) separately is relatively common in general population, and much higher in some disorders. Surprisingly, coexistence of both valve and vessel anomalies has only been reported in single cases.

Materials and methods: From 2008 to 2016, in a single, high-volume tertiary cardiac centre, patients who underwent chest computed tomography (CT) for various reasons, were retrospectively screened for the presence of right ASA.

Results: Seventy-two patients with either right or left ASA were identified by CT. Among them 7 cases of BAV and right ASA coexistence were identified. Additionally, 1 case with coexisting common origin of carotid arteries (COCA) was visualised in this subgroup.

Conclusions: Although coexistence of ASA and BAV has not been reported in paediatric population, it has been diagnosed in very few adults as well as in our series. Additional presence of COCA in this group seems to be very rare. From practical point of view, heart cannulation via the radial artery and subsequent ASA may be challenging. Similarly, COCA presence may have surgical implications during corrective procedures.

Abstract

Background: Prevalence of bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and right aberrant sub-clavian artery (ASA) separately is relatively common in general population, and much higher in some disorders. Surprisingly, coexistence of both valve and vessel anomalies has only been reported in single cases.

Materials and methods: From 2008 to 2016, in a single, high-volume tertiary cardiac centre, patients who underwent chest computed tomography (CT) for various reasons, were retrospectively screened for the presence of right ASA.

Results: Seventy-two patients with either right or left ASA were identified by CT. Among them 7 cases of BAV and right ASA coexistence were identified. Additionally, 1 case with coexisting common origin of carotid arteries (COCA) was visualised in this subgroup.

Conclusions: Although coexistence of ASA and BAV has not been reported in paediatric population, it has been diagnosed in very few adults as well as in our series. Additional presence of COCA in this group seems to be very rare. From practical point of view, heart cannulation via the radial artery and subsequent ASA may be challenging. Similarly, COCA presence may have surgical implications during corrective procedures.

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Keywords

bicuspid aortic valve, arteria lusoria, aberrant subclavian artery

About this article
Title

Coexistence of bicuspid aortic valve, aberrant right subclavian artery and common origin of carotid arteries

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)

Pages

414-419

Published online

2017-02-14

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2017.0015

Pubmed

28198527

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(3):414-419.

Keywords

bicuspid aortic valve
arteria lusoria
aberrant subclavian artery

Authors

P. Tyczyński
I. Michałowska
A. Fronczak
R. Wolny
H. Łazarczyk
S. Kocańda
Z. Chmielak
A. Witkowski

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