open access

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-12-22
Submitted: 2016-09-01
Accepted: 2016-11-07
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Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography of the pulmonary veins and their anatomical variations: involvement in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery-lobectomy for lung cancer

A. Fourdrain, F. De Dominicis, M. Bensussan, J. Iquille, S. Lafitte, D. Michel, P. Berna
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0081
·
Pubmed: 28026848
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(3):388-393.

open access

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-12-22
Submitted: 2016-09-01
Accepted: 2016-11-07

Abstract

Background: Identification and section of pulmonary veins are an essential part of anatomical pulmonary resections. Intraoperative misunderstandings of pulmonary venous anatomy can lead to serious complications such as bleeding and delayed lung infarction or necrosis. We evaluated principally the rate of pulmonary veno­us anatomical variations, and secondarily the reliability and clinical outcomes of a preoperative morphological analysis.

Materials and methods: Between November 2012 and October 2013, we studied 100 consecutive patients with highly suspected or diagnosed stage I-II primitive lung cancer lesion. The surgical procedure initially retained was video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) pulmonary resections and we studied preoperatively the proximal pulmonary venous anatomy using 64 channels multi- -detector computed tomography (CT)-scan angiography to describe the venous anatomical variations.

Results: There were 65 men and 35 women with a mean age of 63 years. A pulmonary venous anatomical variation was present in 36 (36%) patients, and right-sided anatomical variations were more frequent than on left-sided ones (25% vs. 11%). The most frequent variation encountered on the right side was the existence of three separate pulmonary veins (16%), and on the left side a single pulmonary vein (8%). Surgical conversion occurred in 21% and we didn’t experience a pulmonary venous lesion (0%) or a post-operative lung infarction (0%).

Conclusions: We described pulmonary venous anatomical variations and their frequency. Anatomical variations exist and preoperative assessment of pulmo­nary venous anatomy using CT scan is a useful tool in VATS lobectomy to avoid unnecessary extension of pulmonary resections or iatrogenic complications in lung cancer surgery.

Abstract

Background: Identification and section of pulmonary veins are an essential part of anatomical pulmonary resections. Intraoperative misunderstandings of pulmonary venous anatomy can lead to serious complications such as bleeding and delayed lung infarction or necrosis. We evaluated principally the rate of pulmonary veno­us anatomical variations, and secondarily the reliability and clinical outcomes of a preoperative morphological analysis.

Materials and methods: Between November 2012 and October 2013, we studied 100 consecutive patients with highly suspected or diagnosed stage I-II primitive lung cancer lesion. The surgical procedure initially retained was video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) pulmonary resections and we studied preoperatively the proximal pulmonary venous anatomy using 64 channels multi- -detector computed tomography (CT)-scan angiography to describe the venous anatomical variations.

Results: There were 65 men and 35 women with a mean age of 63 years. A pulmonary venous anatomical variation was present in 36 (36%) patients, and right-sided anatomical variations were more frequent than on left-sided ones (25% vs. 11%). The most frequent variation encountered on the right side was the existence of three separate pulmonary veins (16%), and on the left side a single pulmonary vein (8%). Surgical conversion occurred in 21% and we didn’t experience a pulmonary venous lesion (0%) or a post-operative lung infarction (0%).

Conclusions: We described pulmonary venous anatomical variations and their frequency. Anatomical variations exist and preoperative assessment of pulmo­nary venous anatomy using CT scan is a useful tool in VATS lobectomy to avoid unnecessary extension of pulmonary resections or iatrogenic complications in lung cancer surgery.

Get Citation

Keywords

pulmonary vein, anatomical variation, lobectomy, lung cancer, left atrium, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)

About this article
Title

Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography of the pulmonary veins and their anatomical variations: involvement in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery-lobectomy for lung cancer

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 3 (2017)

Pages

388-393

Published online

2016-12-22

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0081

Pubmed

28026848

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(3):388-393.

Keywords

pulmonary vein
anatomical variation
lobectomy
lung cancer
left atrium
video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)

Authors

A. Fourdrain
F. De Dominicis
M. Bensussan
J. Iquille
S. Lafitte
D. Michel
P. Berna

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