open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-12-16
Submitted: 2016-08-27
Accepted: 2016-10-17
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LYVE1 and PROX1 in the reconstruction of hepatic sinusoids after partial hepatectomy in mice

F. Meng
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0074
·
Pubmed: 28026853
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):239-245.

open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-12-16
Submitted: 2016-08-27
Accepted: 2016-10-17

Abstract

Background: Revascularisation is crucial to liver regeneration after liver injury, but the process remains unclear. This study investigated changes in the levels and distribution of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) and prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1) in liver tissue sections after partial hepatectomy in mice.

Materials and methods: Mice were subjected to partial hepatectomy. Control animals were sham-operated. From days 1 through 8, the remaining liver tissues were collected from 8 animals each day. Histology showed that after partial hepatectomy, the remaining liver tissue samples underwent initial degeneration and then hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration. Using immunohistochemical analysis, relative to the control a significantly higher number of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA)-positive hepatocytes was observed on days 4 and 5 after partial hepatectomy.

Results: LYVE1 was mainly present in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and the number of LYVE1-positive cells gradually increased with time. PROX1 was detected in some of the hepatocytes, but liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, artery, and vein were negative for PROX1 staining in the early stage after liver injury. The presence of PROX1 could be observed in some central veins as well as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Seven days after partial hepatectomy, colocalisation of PROX1 and LYVE1 was observed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and veins.

Conclusions: This study revealed the dynamic process of revascularisation and hepatic sinusoid reconstruction during liver regeneration in response to liver injury in mice. PROX1 and LYVE1 may participate in this process and serve as biomarkers for identification of newly formed liver sinusoidal endothelial cells  

Abstract

Background: Revascularisation is crucial to liver regeneration after liver injury, but the process remains unclear. This study investigated changes in the levels and distribution of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) and prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1) in liver tissue sections after partial hepatectomy in mice.

Materials and methods: Mice were subjected to partial hepatectomy. Control animals were sham-operated. From days 1 through 8, the remaining liver tissues were collected from 8 animals each day. Histology showed that after partial hepatectomy, the remaining liver tissue samples underwent initial degeneration and then hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration. Using immunohistochemical analysis, relative to the control a significantly higher number of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA)-positive hepatocytes was observed on days 4 and 5 after partial hepatectomy.

Results: LYVE1 was mainly present in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and the number of LYVE1-positive cells gradually increased with time. PROX1 was detected in some of the hepatocytes, but liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, artery, and vein were negative for PROX1 staining in the early stage after liver injury. The presence of PROX1 could be observed in some central veins as well as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Seven days after partial hepatectomy, colocalisation of PROX1 and LYVE1 was observed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and veins.

Conclusions: This study revealed the dynamic process of revascularisation and hepatic sinusoid reconstruction during liver regeneration in response to liver injury in mice. PROX1 and LYVE1 may participate in this process and serve as biomarkers for identification of newly formed liver sinusoidal endothelial cells  

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Keywords

PROX1, VEGFA, LYVE1, partial hepatectomy, revascularisation

About this article
Title

LYVE1 and PROX1 in the reconstruction of hepatic sinusoids after partial hepatectomy in mice

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)

Pages

239-245

Published online

2016-12-16

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0074

Pubmed

28026853

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):239-245.

Keywords

PROX1
VEGFA
LYVE1
partial hepatectomy
revascularisation

Authors

F. Meng

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