open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-08-24
Submitted: 2016-06-01
Accepted: 2016-07-18
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The myloglossus in a human cadaver study: common or uncommon anatomical structure?

B. Buffoli, M. Ferrari, F. Belotti, D. Lancini, M. A. Cocchi, M. Labanca, M. Tschabitscher, R. Rezzani, L. F. Rodella
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0044
·
Pubmed: 27665952
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):74-81.

open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-08-24
Submitted: 2016-06-01
Accepted: 2016-07-18

Abstract

Background: Additional extrinsic muscles of the tongue are reported in literature and one of them is the myloglossus muscle (MGM). Since MGM is nowadays considered as anatomical variant, the aim of this study is to clarify some open questions by evaluating and describing the myloglossal anatomy (including both MGM and its ligamentous counterpart) during human cadaver dissections.

Materials and methods: Twenty-one regions (including masticator space, sublingual space and adjacent areas) were dissected and the presence and appearance of myloglossus were considered, together with its proximal and distal insertions, vascularisation and innervation.

Results: The myloglossus was present in 61.9% of cases with muscular, ligamentous or mixed appearance and either bony or muscular insertion. Facial artery provided myloglossal vascularisation in the 84.62% and lingual artery in the 15.38%; innervation was granted by the trigeminal system (buccal nerve and mylohyoid nerve), sometimes (46.15%) with hypoglossal component.

Conclusions: These data suggest us to not consider myloglossus as a rare anatomical variant.  

Abstract

Background: Additional extrinsic muscles of the tongue are reported in literature and one of them is the myloglossus muscle (MGM). Since MGM is nowadays considered as anatomical variant, the aim of this study is to clarify some open questions by evaluating and describing the myloglossal anatomy (including both MGM and its ligamentous counterpart) during human cadaver dissections.

Materials and methods: Twenty-one regions (including masticator space, sublingual space and adjacent areas) were dissected and the presence and appearance of myloglossus were considered, together with its proximal and distal insertions, vascularisation and innervation.

Results: The myloglossus was present in 61.9% of cases with muscular, ligamentous or mixed appearance and either bony or muscular insertion. Facial artery provided myloglossal vascularisation in the 84.62% and lingual artery in the 15.38%; innervation was granted by the trigeminal system (buccal nerve and mylohyoid nerve), sometimes (46.15%) with hypoglossal component.

Conclusions: These data suggest us to not consider myloglossus as a rare anatomical variant.  

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Keywords

anatomical variant, dissection, myloglossus, tongue

About this article
Title

The myloglossus in a human cadaver study: common or uncommon anatomical structure?

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)

Pages

74-81

Published online

2016-08-24

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0044

Pubmed

27665952

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):74-81.

Keywords

anatomical variant
dissection
myloglossus
tongue

Authors

B. Buffoli
M. Ferrari
F. Belotti
D. Lancini
M. A. Cocchi
M. Labanca
M. Tschabitscher
R. Rezzani
L. F. Rodella

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