open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-09-23
Submitted: 2016-05-29
Accepted: 2016-07-06
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Congenital coronary artery anomalies in adult population detected using dual source ECG-gated CTA in a single institution

R. T. Mathai, D. M. Fahmy, H. L. Sadek, W. M. Renno
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0053
·
Pubmed: 27665960
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):208-218.

open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-09-23
Submitted: 2016-05-29
Accepted: 2016-07-06

Abstract

Background: Congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries (CAs) are rare and are often diagnosed incidentally during a conventional coronary angiography. Recently, the incidence of these congenital defects is on the rise particularly after the introduction of the electrocardiography (ECG) gated coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). This innovative radiological screening modality has led to the most precise mapping of the course of the CAs on computed tomographic scan. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence and describe the CAs congenital anomalies and their variations in Kuwaiti population at a single institution experience.

Materials and methods: We analysed the CCTA data obtained consecutively from 842 patients (2013–2014), retrospectively. The inclusion criteria for patients’ selection were: atypical chest pain, equivocal ECG, assessment of patency of coronary stents or grafts and pre-operative screening. Information was acquiesced using a dual-source CT scanner with ECG gating.

Results: Data analysis revealed that 22 (2.61%) patients were found to have CA anomalies out of the 842 patients who underwent CCTA. Out of these CA anomalies, 13 cases showed more than two ostia, 7 cases showed the ectopic origin of a CA from opposite sinus or non-aortic sinus, 2 cases showed single coronary ostium and 1 case showed coronary artery with pulmonary fistula. Also, myocardial bridging was identified in 78 (9.26%) patients whereas ramus intermedius branch was identified in 160 (19%) patients.

Conclusions: The prevalence of CA anomalies in Kuwait was 2.6%, which is relatively higher than previously reported studies from different countries.

Abstract

Background: Congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries (CAs) are rare and are often diagnosed incidentally during a conventional coronary angiography. Recently, the incidence of these congenital defects is on the rise particularly after the introduction of the electrocardiography (ECG) gated coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). This innovative radiological screening modality has led to the most precise mapping of the course of the CAs on computed tomographic scan. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence and describe the CAs congenital anomalies and their variations in Kuwaiti population at a single institution experience.

Materials and methods: We analysed the CCTA data obtained consecutively from 842 patients (2013–2014), retrospectively. The inclusion criteria for patients’ selection were: atypical chest pain, equivocal ECG, assessment of patency of coronary stents or grafts and pre-operative screening. Information was acquiesced using a dual-source CT scanner with ECG gating.

Results: Data analysis revealed that 22 (2.61%) patients were found to have CA anomalies out of the 842 patients who underwent CCTA. Out of these CA anomalies, 13 cases showed more than two ostia, 7 cases showed the ectopic origin of a CA from opposite sinus or non-aortic sinus, 2 cases showed single coronary ostium and 1 case showed coronary artery with pulmonary fistula. Also, myocardial bridging was identified in 78 (9.26%) patients whereas ramus intermedius branch was identified in 160 (19%) patients.

Conclusions: The prevalence of CA anomalies in Kuwait was 2.6%, which is relatively higher than previously reported studies from different countries.

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Keywords

congenital anomalies, coronary arteries, CCTA, prevalence, computed tomography scan

About this article
Title

Congenital coronary artery anomalies in adult population detected using dual source ECG-gated CTA in a single institution

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)

Pages

208-218

Published online

2016-09-23

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0053

Pubmed

27665960

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):208-218.

Keywords

congenital anomalies
coronary arteries
CCTA
prevalence
computed tomography scan

Authors

R. T. Mathai
D. M. Fahmy
H. L. Sadek
W. M. Renno

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