open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-09-23
Submitted: 2016-05-08
Accepted: 2016-07-09
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The relationship between the dimensions of the internal auditory canal and the anomalies of the vestibulocochlear nerve

A. O. El Sadik, M. H. Shaaban
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0052
·
Pubmed: 27665959
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):178-185.

open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-09-23
Submitted: 2016-05-08
Accepted: 2016-07-09

Abstract

Background: Internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis and vestibulocochlear nerve (VCN) abnormalities have been reported to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Previous studies classified the normal dimensions of the IAC and its anomalies with no consideration of the VCN. Other studies categorised the VCN development in only stenotic canals. In the present study, an anatomical classification of the normal dimensions of the IAC and its anomalies and their association with malformations of the VCN and its subdivisions were described.

Materials and methods: Retrospective review was undertaken for children ranged from 1 to 10 years. A total of 764 canals were investigated for pre-operative assessment of cochlear implantation. Other 100 canals of normal hearing ears were included as the control group. The maximum anteroposterior diameter, considered the width of the canal, was measured in axial plane and the length of the canal was identified in coronal plane. The canals were categorised normal: if they are from 3 to 8 mm, patulous: if they are more than 8 mm, stenotic: if they are less than 3 mm and atretic if absent, using multislice computed tomography. The VCN trunks and their subdivisions were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging.

Results: Internal auditory canals were found normal in 66% with a mean width: 5.27 ± ± 0.68, patulous in 17% with a mean width 113% more than that of the control group (p = 0.000), stenotic in 13% with a mean width 73% less as compared to that of the control group (p = 0.000) and atretic in 4% of the experimental canals. The VCN trunks were found normal with well-developed subdivisions in 77.8% of the normal canals, 98.4% of the patulous canals, and 19.2% of the stenotic canals. The VCN trunks were normal with hypoplastic subdivisions in 11.3% of the normal canals, 1.6% in the patulous canals, and 61.6% in the stenotic canals with a mean width 52% less than that of the normal trunk with developed subdivisions. Hypoplastic VCN trunks with absent subdivisions were reported in 7.3% of the normal canals, 11.1% of the stenotic canals and in 3.2% of the atretic canals. The VCN trunks were not found in 3.6% of the normal canals, in 8.1% of the stenotic canals and in 96.8% of the atretic canals.

Conclusions: Internal auditory canal formation was dependent on the process of development and growth of the eighth cranial nerve and its subdivisions that greatly affected the completion of IAC canalisation. This paper could serve as a reference providing a quantitative classification of the relationship between the dimensions of the IAC and the development of the VCN trunk and its subdivisions.

Abstract

Background: Internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis and vestibulocochlear nerve (VCN) abnormalities have been reported to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Previous studies classified the normal dimensions of the IAC and its anomalies with no consideration of the VCN. Other studies categorised the VCN development in only stenotic canals. In the present study, an anatomical classification of the normal dimensions of the IAC and its anomalies and their association with malformations of the VCN and its subdivisions were described.

Materials and methods: Retrospective review was undertaken for children ranged from 1 to 10 years. A total of 764 canals were investigated for pre-operative assessment of cochlear implantation. Other 100 canals of normal hearing ears were included as the control group. The maximum anteroposterior diameter, considered the width of the canal, was measured in axial plane and the length of the canal was identified in coronal plane. The canals were categorised normal: if they are from 3 to 8 mm, patulous: if they are more than 8 mm, stenotic: if they are less than 3 mm and atretic if absent, using multislice computed tomography. The VCN trunks and their subdivisions were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging.

Results: Internal auditory canals were found normal in 66% with a mean width: 5.27 ± ± 0.68, patulous in 17% with a mean width 113% more than that of the control group (p = 0.000), stenotic in 13% with a mean width 73% less as compared to that of the control group (p = 0.000) and atretic in 4% of the experimental canals. The VCN trunks were found normal with well-developed subdivisions in 77.8% of the normal canals, 98.4% of the patulous canals, and 19.2% of the stenotic canals. The VCN trunks were normal with hypoplastic subdivisions in 11.3% of the normal canals, 1.6% in the patulous canals, and 61.6% in the stenotic canals with a mean width 52% less than that of the normal trunk with developed subdivisions. Hypoplastic VCN trunks with absent subdivisions were reported in 7.3% of the normal canals, 11.1% of the stenotic canals and in 3.2% of the atretic canals. The VCN trunks were not found in 3.6% of the normal canals, in 8.1% of the stenotic canals and in 96.8% of the atretic canals.

Conclusions: Internal auditory canal formation was dependent on the process of development and growth of the eighth cranial nerve and its subdivisions that greatly affected the completion of IAC canalisation. This paper could serve as a reference providing a quantitative classification of the relationship between the dimensions of the IAC and the development of the VCN trunk and its subdivisions.

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Keywords

vestibulocochlear nerve, internal auditory canal, multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging

About this article
Title

The relationship between the dimensions of the internal auditory canal and the anomalies of the vestibulocochlear nerve

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)

Pages

178-185

Published online

2016-09-23

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0052

Pubmed

27665959

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):178-185.

Keywords

vestibulocochlear nerve
internal auditory canal
multislice computed tomography
magnetic resonance imaging

Authors

A. O. El Sadik
M. H. Shaaban

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