open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-10-10
Submitted: 2016-04-28
Accepted: 2016-09-11
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Immunohistochemical study of sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla of neonatal and adult rats using an antibody against S-100 protein

A. M. Ahmed
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0066
·
Pubmed: 27813629
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):246-251.

open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-10-10
Submitted: 2016-04-28
Accepted: 2016-09-11

Abstract

Background: This study was performed to investigate the light microscopic features of sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla in neonatal and adult male albino rats using an antibody against S-100 protein. S-100 expression in sustentacular cells is considered a reliable cell marker for this type of cells.

Materials and methods: Twenty-four male albino rats were allocated into two groups, neonatal group (1 week old, 12 rats) and adult group (3 months old, 12 rats). Paraffin sections of the adrenal glands were immunostained for the expression of S-100 protein.

Results: The results demonstrated differences in distribution, arrangement and structure of sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla in neonatal and adult rats. All sustentacular cells of adrenal medulla in all animals showed intense immunoreactivity for S-100 protein in their nuclei, perikarya, and cytoplasmic processes. Most of S-100 immunopositive sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla of neonatal rats are few, dispersed, small in size, and oval in shape with thin short bipolar cytoplasmic processes. These cells in adult rats are more numerous, larger in size, and stellate in shape with numerous slender, longer branched cytoplasmic processes.

Conclusions: This study indicated that adrenal medullary sustentacular cells showed obvious morphological postnatal changes with aging suggesting structural and functional maturation.  

Abstract

Background: This study was performed to investigate the light microscopic features of sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla in neonatal and adult male albino rats using an antibody against S-100 protein. S-100 expression in sustentacular cells is considered a reliable cell marker for this type of cells.

Materials and methods: Twenty-four male albino rats were allocated into two groups, neonatal group (1 week old, 12 rats) and adult group (3 months old, 12 rats). Paraffin sections of the adrenal glands were immunostained for the expression of S-100 protein.

Results: The results demonstrated differences in distribution, arrangement and structure of sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla in neonatal and adult rats. All sustentacular cells of adrenal medulla in all animals showed intense immunoreactivity for S-100 protein in their nuclei, perikarya, and cytoplasmic processes. Most of S-100 immunopositive sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla of neonatal rats are few, dispersed, small in size, and oval in shape with thin short bipolar cytoplasmic processes. These cells in adult rats are more numerous, larger in size, and stellate in shape with numerous slender, longer branched cytoplasmic processes.

Conclusions: This study indicated that adrenal medullary sustentacular cells showed obvious morphological postnatal changes with aging suggesting structural and functional maturation.  

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Keywords

adrenal medulla, sustentacular cells, S-100 protein, immunohistochemistry, rat

About this article
Title

Immunohistochemical study of sustentacular cells in adrenal medulla of neonatal and adult rats using an antibody against S-100 protein

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)

Pages

246-251

Published online

2016-10-10

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0066

Pubmed

27813629

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):246-251.

Keywords

adrenal medulla
sustentacular cells
S-100 protein
immunohistochemistry
rat

Authors

A. M. Ahmed

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