open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-07-04
Submitted: 2016-03-14
Accepted: 2016-05-19
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Adrenal medulla of AS/AGU rats: a histological and immunohistochemical study

M. A. Al-Fayez, M. Atteya, R. A. Mohamed, A. M. Ahmed, A. H. Alroalle, M. Salah Khalil, M. Al-Ahmed, A. Payne
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0036
·
Pubmed: 27830890
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):28-37.

open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-07-04
Submitted: 2016-03-14
Accepted: 2016-05-19

Abstract

Background: The outcome of the autograft therapy for Parkinson’s disease including autologous cells from adrenal medulla was disappointing. This could be attributed to the pathological process in Parkinson’s disease affecting cells of the adrenal medulla. This study was performed to investigate the histopathological changes in the adrenal medulla of AS/AGU rat, a model of Parkinson’s disease, in comparison with Albino Swiss (AS) rats.

Materials and methods: A total of 24 male AS rats were divided into four groups, each of 6 animals: AS W1 — AS rats aged 1 week; AS adult — AS adult rats; AS/ /AGU W1 — AS/AGU rats aged 1 week; and AS/AGU adult — AS/AGU adult rats. The rats were sacrificed and the adrenal glands were dissected and processed for histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff and for immunohistochemical staining for S100 protein, ubiquitin and tyrosine hydroxylase.

Results: The histological investigation of the adrenal medulla of AS/AGU rats showed vascular congestion, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pyknotic nuclei, necrotic chromaffin cells and medullary inclusion bodies. The immunohistochemical investigation of AS/AGU rats showed a statistically significant decrease in the expression of S100 protein, ubiquitin and tyrosine hydroxylase compared to AS rats.

Conclusions: The histological and immunohistological changes in the adrenal medulla could explain the failure of outcome of adrenal autograft therapy in Parkinson’s disease.  

Abstract

Background: The outcome of the autograft therapy for Parkinson’s disease including autologous cells from adrenal medulla was disappointing. This could be attributed to the pathological process in Parkinson’s disease affecting cells of the adrenal medulla. This study was performed to investigate the histopathological changes in the adrenal medulla of AS/AGU rat, a model of Parkinson’s disease, in comparison with Albino Swiss (AS) rats.

Materials and methods: A total of 24 male AS rats were divided into four groups, each of 6 animals: AS W1 — AS rats aged 1 week; AS adult — AS adult rats; AS/ /AGU W1 — AS/AGU rats aged 1 week; and AS/AGU adult — AS/AGU adult rats. The rats were sacrificed and the adrenal glands were dissected and processed for histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff and for immunohistochemical staining for S100 protein, ubiquitin and tyrosine hydroxylase.

Results: The histological investigation of the adrenal medulla of AS/AGU rats showed vascular congestion, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pyknotic nuclei, necrotic chromaffin cells and medullary inclusion bodies. The immunohistochemical investigation of AS/AGU rats showed a statistically significant decrease in the expression of S100 protein, ubiquitin and tyrosine hydroxylase compared to AS rats.

Conclusions: The histological and immunohistological changes in the adrenal medulla could explain the failure of outcome of adrenal autograft therapy in Parkinson’s disease.  

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Keywords

AS rats, AS/AGU rats, Parkinson’s disease, adrenal medulla, histology, immunohistochemistry, S100, ubiquitin, tyrosin hydroxylase

About this article
Title

Adrenal medulla of AS/AGU rats: a histological and immunohistochemical study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)

Pages

28-37

Published online

2016-07-04

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0036

Pubmed

27830890

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):28-37.

Keywords

AS rats
AS/AGU rats
Parkinson’s disease
adrenal medulla
histology
immunohistochemistry
S100
ubiquitin
tyrosin hydroxylase

Authors

M. A. Al-Fayez
M. Atteya
R. A. Mohamed
A. M. Ahmed
A. H. Alroalle
M. Salah Khalil
M. Al-Ahmed
A. Payne

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