open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-07-04
Submitted: 2016-03-11
Accepted: 2016-05-28
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Morphometric evaluation of the delayed cerebral arteries response to acetazolamide test in patients with chronic carotid artery stenosis using computed tomography angiography

A. Szarmach, P. J. Winklewski, G. Halena, M. Kaszubowski, J. Dzierżanowski, M. Piskunowicz, E. Szurowska, A. F. Frydrychowski
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0034
·
Pubmed: 27830888
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):10-14.

open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-07-04
Submitted: 2016-03-11
Accepted: 2016-05-28

Abstract

Background: The evidence accumulates that the response to acetazolamide test is delayed on the ipsilateral side to stenosis. However, the effect of acetazolamide beyond 30 min after acetazolamide administration remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the diameters of anterior cerebral arteries (ACAs), middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) before and 60 min after the acetazolamide test.

Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with carotid artery stenosis ≥ 90% on the ipsilateral side and ≤ 50% on the contralateral side were enrolled into the study. Diagnosis was based on ultrasonography examination and was confirmed using digital subtractive angiography. In all patients, two computed tomography angiography examinations were carried out; the first was performed before the acetazolamide administration, while the second one was carried out 60 min after injections.

Results: In response to the acetazolamide test: PCA diameter diminished in both ipsi- and contra-lateral side to stenosis (from 1.31 to 1.24 mm and from 1.23 to 1.15 mm, respectively), ACA and MCA decreased in the contralateral side to the stenosis (from 1.33 to 1.26 mm and from 2.75 to 2.66 mm, respectively), ACA and MCA increased in the ipsilateral side to the stenosis (from 1.29 to 1.46 mm and from 2.77 to 2.96 mm, respectively). All changes were statistically significant.

Conclusions: There were significant differences in reactivity to acetazolamide challenge between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and vertebrobasilar circulation in patients suffering from chronic carotid artery stenosis. Within the ICA territory, ACA and MCA responses vary in the affected and not affected side.  

Abstract

Background: The evidence accumulates that the response to acetazolamide test is delayed on the ipsilateral side to stenosis. However, the effect of acetazolamide beyond 30 min after acetazolamide administration remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the diameters of anterior cerebral arteries (ACAs), middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) before and 60 min after the acetazolamide test.

Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with carotid artery stenosis ≥ 90% on the ipsilateral side and ≤ 50% on the contralateral side were enrolled into the study. Diagnosis was based on ultrasonography examination and was confirmed using digital subtractive angiography. In all patients, two computed tomography angiography examinations were carried out; the first was performed before the acetazolamide administration, while the second one was carried out 60 min after injections.

Results: In response to the acetazolamide test: PCA diameter diminished in both ipsi- and contra-lateral side to stenosis (from 1.31 to 1.24 mm and from 1.23 to 1.15 mm, respectively), ACA and MCA decreased in the contralateral side to the stenosis (from 1.33 to 1.26 mm and from 2.75 to 2.66 mm, respectively), ACA and MCA increased in the ipsilateral side to the stenosis (from 1.29 to 1.46 mm and from 2.77 to 2.96 mm, respectively). All changes were statistically significant.

Conclusions: There were significant differences in reactivity to acetazolamide challenge between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and vertebrobasilar circulation in patients suffering from chronic carotid artery stenosis. Within the ICA territory, ACA and MCA responses vary in the affected and not affected side.  

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Keywords

cerebral arteries, computed tomography angiography, acetazolamide test, cerebral regional reactivity

About this article
Title

Morphometric evaluation of the delayed cerebral arteries response to acetazolamide test in patients with chronic carotid artery stenosis using computed tomography angiography

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)

Pages

10-14

Published online

2016-07-04

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0034

Pubmed

27830888

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):10-14.

Keywords

cerebral arteries
computed tomography angiography
acetazolamide test
cerebral regional reactivity

Authors

A. Szarmach
P. J. Winklewski
G. Halena
M. Kaszubowski
J. Dzierżanowski
M. Piskunowicz
E. Szurowska
A. F. Frydrychowski

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