open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-06-08
Submitted: 2016-02-23
Accepted: 2016-04-14
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Anatomical transverse magnetic resonance imaging study of ligaments in palmar surface of metacarpus in Miniature donkey: identification of a new ligament

M. N. Nazem, S. M. Sajjadian
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0032
·
Pubmed: 27830887
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):110-116.

open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-06-08
Submitted: 2016-02-23
Accepted: 2016-04-14

Abstract

Background: Palmar region of metacarpus in the horses and donkeys is an important region because of its tendons and ligaments which contribute to stay apparatus. This study was done on forelimbs of 6 healthy Miniature donkeys to detect the tendons, ligaments and their accessories on the palmar surface of metacarpus in this animal.

Materials and methods: Based on that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a good technique to evaluate the soft tissues such as tendons and ligaments, palmar aspects of metacarpus in 6 euthanatised Miniature donkeys were prepared for anatomical and trans-sectional MRI studies to determine the tendons and ligaments in this region.

Results: Suspensory ligament, deep digital flexor tendon and its inferior check ligament were similar to them in the horse. Superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) in this animal had superior check ligament that was present before the carpal joint. On the other hand in the Miniature donkey there was a second accessory ligament for the SDFT that originated from the proximal of palmar surface of the large metacarpal bone which we named it second accessory ligament of SDFT. This ligament was determined in the MRI images too.

Conclusions: It seems that this ligament helps the Miniature donkey to stay apparatus, supporting more weight and load for a longer period of time and distance which is a specific morphological feature in this animal.  

Abstract

Background: Palmar region of metacarpus in the horses and donkeys is an important region because of its tendons and ligaments which contribute to stay apparatus. This study was done on forelimbs of 6 healthy Miniature donkeys to detect the tendons, ligaments and their accessories on the palmar surface of metacarpus in this animal.

Materials and methods: Based on that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a good technique to evaluate the soft tissues such as tendons and ligaments, palmar aspects of metacarpus in 6 euthanatised Miniature donkeys were prepared for anatomical and trans-sectional MRI studies to determine the tendons and ligaments in this region.

Results: Suspensory ligament, deep digital flexor tendon and its inferior check ligament were similar to them in the horse. Superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) in this animal had superior check ligament that was present before the carpal joint. On the other hand in the Miniature donkey there was a second accessory ligament for the SDFT that originated from the proximal of palmar surface of the large metacarpal bone which we named it second accessory ligament of SDFT. This ligament was determined in the MRI images too.

Conclusions: It seems that this ligament helps the Miniature donkey to stay apparatus, supporting more weight and load for a longer period of time and distance which is a specific morphological feature in this animal.  

Get Citation

Keywords

Miniature donkey, superficial digital flexor tendon, second accessory ligament

About this article
Title

Anatomical transverse magnetic resonance imaging study of ligaments in palmar surface of metacarpus in Miniature donkey: identification of a new ligament

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)

Pages

110-116

Published online

2016-06-08

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0032

Pubmed

27830887

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):110-116.

Keywords

Miniature donkey
superficial digital flexor tendon
second accessory ligament

Authors

M. N. Nazem
S. M. Sajjadian

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