open access

Vol 75, No 4 (2016)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-03-17
Submitted: 2015-07-29
Accepted: 2015-12-21
Get Citation

Anatomical eponyms — unloved names in medical terminology

F. Burdan, W. Dworzański, M. Cendrowska-Pinkosz, M. Burdan, A. Dworzańska
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0012
·
Pubmed: 27830870
·
Folia Morphol 2016;75(4):413-438.

open access

Vol 75, No 4 (2016)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-03-17
Submitted: 2015-07-29
Accepted: 2015-12-21

Abstract

Uniform international terminology is a fundamental issue of medicine. Names of various organs or structures have developed since early human history. The first proper anatomical books were written by Hippocrates, Aristotle and Galen. For this reason the modern terms originated from Latin or Greek. In a modern time the terminology was improved in particular by Vasalius, Fabricius and Harvey. Presently each known structure has internationally approved term that is explained in anatomical or histological terminology. However, some elements received eponyms, terms that incorporate the surname of the people that usually describe them for the first time or studied them (e.g., circle of Willis, follicle of Graff, fossa of Sylvious, foramen of Monro, Adamkiewicz artery). Literature and historical hero also influenced medical vocabulary (e.g. Achilles tendon and Atlas). According to various scientists, all the eponyms bring colour to medicine, embed medical traditions and culture to our history but lack accuracy, lead of confusion, and hamper scientific discussion. The current article presents a wide list of the anatomical eponyms with their proper anatomical term or description according to international anatomical terminology. However, since different eponyms are used in various countries, the list could be expanded.

Abstract

Uniform international terminology is a fundamental issue of medicine. Names of various organs or structures have developed since early human history. The first proper anatomical books were written by Hippocrates, Aristotle and Galen. For this reason the modern terms originated from Latin or Greek. In a modern time the terminology was improved in particular by Vasalius, Fabricius and Harvey. Presently each known structure has internationally approved term that is explained in anatomical or histological terminology. However, some elements received eponyms, terms that incorporate the surname of the people that usually describe them for the first time or studied them (e.g., circle of Willis, follicle of Graff, fossa of Sylvious, foramen of Monro, Adamkiewicz artery). Literature and historical hero also influenced medical vocabulary (e.g. Achilles tendon and Atlas). According to various scientists, all the eponyms bring colour to medicine, embed medical traditions and culture to our history but lack accuracy, lead of confusion, and hamper scientific discussion. The current article presents a wide list of the anatomical eponyms with their proper anatomical term or description according to international anatomical terminology. However, since different eponyms are used in various countries, the list could be expanded.

Get Citation

Keywords

eponyms, anatomical terminology, anatomical term

About this article
Title

Anatomical eponyms — unloved names in medical terminology

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 75, No 4 (2016)

Pages

413-438

Published online

2016-03-17

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0012

Pubmed

27830870

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2016;75(4):413-438.

Keywords

eponyms
anatomical terminology
anatomical term

Authors

F. Burdan
W. Dworzański
M. Cendrowska-Pinkosz
M. Burdan
A. Dworzańska

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