open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-08-22
Submitted: 2015-07-13
Accepted: 2015-09-03
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Morphometric analysis of the mandible in the Durban Metropolitan population of South Africa

S. Ishwarkumar, P. Pillay, M. R. Haffajee, K. S. Satyapal
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0041
·
Pubmed: 27665949
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):82-86.

open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-08-22
Submitted: 2015-07-13
Accepted: 2015-09-03

Abstract

Background: The identification of an individual from skeletal remains plays a vital role in forensic investigation as it is essential for the identification of the individual’s age, sex, and/or race and further analysis. Skeletal characteristics differ from one population group to another since population-specific osteometric standards exist for sex determination. Since the mandible is the largest, strongest and most durable compact facial bone, it is the best preserved after death. While sexual dimorphism of the mandible is indicated by its shape and size, morphometric analysis is more accurate in the determination of sex from the skull. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric parameters of the mandible in the Durban Metropolitan population.

Materials and methods: Various morphometric parameters of the mandible were measured and assessed in 265 digital panoramic radiographs aged between 16 and 30 years (n = 530). Each parameter recorded was statistically analysed using SPSS to determine if a relationship existed between the parameter, and sex and age.

Results: In this study the morphometric parameters of the male mandibles were greater than that of the females. This concurred with the findings of previous studies. The length of the mandibular ramus on the right and left sides was statistically significant with sex.

Conclusions: This correlated with previous studies, indicating that the length of the mandibular ramus generally has higher sexual dimorphism than any other morphometric mandibular parameter (p = 0.000). However, only the length of the right mandibular body was statistically significant when compared with sex (p = 0.040). The findings of this study may assist forensic investigators, anatomists, anthropologists and maxillo-facial surgeons.  

Abstract

Background: The identification of an individual from skeletal remains plays a vital role in forensic investigation as it is essential for the identification of the individual’s age, sex, and/or race and further analysis. Skeletal characteristics differ from one population group to another since population-specific osteometric standards exist for sex determination. Since the mandible is the largest, strongest and most durable compact facial bone, it is the best preserved after death. While sexual dimorphism of the mandible is indicated by its shape and size, morphometric analysis is more accurate in the determination of sex from the skull. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric parameters of the mandible in the Durban Metropolitan population.

Materials and methods: Various morphometric parameters of the mandible were measured and assessed in 265 digital panoramic radiographs aged between 16 and 30 years (n = 530). Each parameter recorded was statistically analysed using SPSS to determine if a relationship existed between the parameter, and sex and age.

Results: In this study the morphometric parameters of the male mandibles were greater than that of the females. This concurred with the findings of previous studies. The length of the mandibular ramus on the right and left sides was statistically significant with sex.

Conclusions: This correlated with previous studies, indicating that the length of the mandibular ramus generally has higher sexual dimorphism than any other morphometric mandibular parameter (p = 0.000). However, only the length of the right mandibular body was statistically significant when compared with sex (p = 0.040). The findings of this study may assist forensic investigators, anatomists, anthropologists and maxillo-facial surgeons.  

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Keywords

mandible, morphometry, radiology, mandibular body, mandibular ramus

About this article
Title

Morphometric analysis of the mandible in the Durban Metropolitan population of South Africa

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 1 (2017)

Pages

82-86

Published online

2016-08-22

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0041

Pubmed

27665949

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(1):82-86.

Keywords

mandible
morphometry
radiology
mandibular body
mandibular ramus

Authors

S. Ishwarkumar
P. Pillay
M. R. Haffajee
K. S. Satyapal

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