open access

Vol 75, No 1 (2016)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-09-03
Submitted: 2015-03-15
Accepted: 2015-04-20
Get Citation

Prevalence of generalised joint hypermobility in school-aged children from east-central European region

A. Gocentas, N. Jascaniniene, M. Pasek, W. Przybylski, E. Matulyte, D. Mieliauskaite, K. Kwilecki, J. Jaszczanin
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2015.0065
·
Pubmed: 26365863
·
Folia Morphol 2016;75(1):48-52.

open access

Vol 75, No 1 (2016)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-09-03
Submitted: 2015-03-15
Accepted: 2015-04-20

Abstract

Background: There is no literature regarding joint mobility in children of the Central and Eastern Europe. Studies describing clinical characteristics and functional outcomes are still needed. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of generalised joint hypermobility (GJH) in the group of school-aged children from Vilnius, the capital city of Lithuania, in relation to different cut-off values of the Beighton score (BS), and to identify possible patients with joint hypermobility syndrome.

Materials and methods: The representative sample of this study was calculated to be 760 subjects. A total of 778 children from different schools were screened for the mobility of joints. The medical examination included an assessment of joints’ hypermobility according to the BS. The presence of specific signs (marfanoid habitus, antimongoloid slant and drooping eyelids) was assessed additionally. Parents of all involved children were asked to answer the questions developed based on the Brighton criteria regarding the medical history of children.

Results: The prevalence of GJH in school-aged children from Vilnius, depending on the BS cut-off value, was 19.2% (BS ≥ 4), 9.5% (BS ≥ 5) or 5.7% (BS ≥ 6). The increased range of mobility was most frequently detected in thumbs of school- -aged children. The frequency of hyperextension > 10o in knees was 7- to 8-fold lower than the frequency of hyperextension > 10o in a passive opposition of the thumb. The evaluation results were similar on the left and right sides in 87.4% cases of thumb opposition, 90.1% cases of hyperextension of 5th finger, 87.9% cases of elbow manoeuvres, and 94.8% attempts to hyperextend knee.

Conclusions: The prevalence of GJH in school-aged children from Vilnius depends on the BS cut-off value and ranges from 5.7% to 19.2%.  

Abstract

Background: There is no literature regarding joint mobility in children of the Central and Eastern Europe. Studies describing clinical characteristics and functional outcomes are still needed. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of generalised joint hypermobility (GJH) in the group of school-aged children from Vilnius, the capital city of Lithuania, in relation to different cut-off values of the Beighton score (BS), and to identify possible patients with joint hypermobility syndrome.

Materials and methods: The representative sample of this study was calculated to be 760 subjects. A total of 778 children from different schools were screened for the mobility of joints. The medical examination included an assessment of joints’ hypermobility according to the BS. The presence of specific signs (marfanoid habitus, antimongoloid slant and drooping eyelids) was assessed additionally. Parents of all involved children were asked to answer the questions developed based on the Brighton criteria regarding the medical history of children.

Results: The prevalence of GJH in school-aged children from Vilnius, depending on the BS cut-off value, was 19.2% (BS ≥ 4), 9.5% (BS ≥ 5) or 5.7% (BS ≥ 6). The increased range of mobility was most frequently detected in thumbs of school- -aged children. The frequency of hyperextension > 10o in knees was 7- to 8-fold lower than the frequency of hyperextension > 10o in a passive opposition of the thumb. The evaluation results were similar on the left and right sides in 87.4% cases of thumb opposition, 90.1% cases of hyperextension of 5th finger, 87.9% cases of elbow manoeuvres, and 94.8% attempts to hyperextend knee.

Conclusions: The prevalence of GJH in school-aged children from Vilnius depends on the BS cut-off value and ranges from 5.7% to 19.2%.  

Get Citation

Keywords

generalised joint hypermobility, prevalence, school-aged children, Beighton score, Brighton criteria

About this article
Title

Prevalence of generalised joint hypermobility in school-aged children from east-central European region

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 75, No 1 (2016)

Pages

48-52

Published online

2015-09-03

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2015.0065

Pubmed

26365863

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2016;75(1):48-52.

Keywords

generalised joint hypermobility
prevalence
school-aged children
Beighton score
Brighton criteria

Authors

A. Gocentas
N. Jascaniniene
M. Pasek
W. Przybylski
E. Matulyte
D. Mieliauskaite
K. Kwilecki
J. Jaszczanin

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl