open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-08-29
Submitted: 2015-03-04
Accepted: 2015-05-28
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Coronary artery dominance dependent collateral development in the human heart

N. O. Ajayi, E. A. Vanker, K. S. Satyapal
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0051
·
Pubmed: 27665958
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):191-196.

open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-08-29
Submitted: 2015-03-04
Accepted: 2015-05-28

Abstract

Background: In obstructive coronary artery disease, coronary collateral arteries serve as alternative conduits for blood flow to the myocardial tissue supplied by the obstructed vessel(s). Therefore, they are a “natural coronary arterial bypass” to the region supplied by the obstructed vessels. This study aims to determine the influence of demographic and morphologic coronary arterial factors on coronary collateral development in coronary arterial obstruction.

Materials and methods: The study group was selected from the coronary angiographic records of 2029 consecutive patients (mean age: 59 ± 12 years). Coronary collaterals were graded from 0 to 3 based on the collateral connection between the donor and recipient arteries. The angiograms of the patients (n = 286) with total obstruction of the coronary arteries were selected for analysis.

Results: There were no significant association between patients’ age and sex and the formation of excellent collaterals. However, the location of atherosclerotic lesion affected collateral development in the right coronary artery. In addition, the right coronary arterial dominant pattern significantly influenced the formation of excellent coronary collaterals.

Conclusions: Coronary collateral arteries are better developed in right dominant pattern. It may be concluded that coronary arterial morphological pattern influences coronary collateral artery development.

Abstract

Background: In obstructive coronary artery disease, coronary collateral arteries serve as alternative conduits for blood flow to the myocardial tissue supplied by the obstructed vessel(s). Therefore, they are a “natural coronary arterial bypass” to the region supplied by the obstructed vessels. This study aims to determine the influence of demographic and morphologic coronary arterial factors on coronary collateral development in coronary arterial obstruction.

Materials and methods: The study group was selected from the coronary angiographic records of 2029 consecutive patients (mean age: 59 ± 12 years). Coronary collaterals were graded from 0 to 3 based on the collateral connection between the donor and recipient arteries. The angiograms of the patients (n = 286) with total obstruction of the coronary arteries were selected for analysis.

Results: There were no significant association between patients’ age and sex and the formation of excellent collaterals. However, the location of atherosclerotic lesion affected collateral development in the right coronary artery. In addition, the right coronary arterial dominant pattern significantly influenced the formation of excellent coronary collaterals.

Conclusions: Coronary collateral arteries are better developed in right dominant pattern. It may be concluded that coronary arterial morphological pattern influences coronary collateral artery development.

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Keywords

coronary artery obstruction, coronary collateral artery, coronary arterial dominance

About this article
Title

Coronary artery dominance dependent collateral development in the human heart

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)

Pages

191-196

Published online

2016-08-29

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0051

Pubmed

27665958

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):191-196.

Keywords

coronary artery obstruction
coronary collateral artery
coronary arterial dominance

Authors

N. O. Ajayi
E. A. Vanker
K. S. Satyapal

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