open access

Vol 74, No 2 (2015)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-05-28
Submitted: 2014-07-28
Accepted: 2014-09-17
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Septal aperture aetiology: still more questions than answers

A. Myszka
DOI: 10.5603/FM.2015.0034
·
Pubmed: 26050810
·
Folia Morphol 2015;74(2):219-224.

open access

Vol 74, No 2 (2015)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-05-28
Submitted: 2014-07-28
Accepted: 2014-09-17

Abstract

Many theories have been suggested in order to explain the aetiology of septal aperture. The influence of genes, the size and shape of ulna processes, joint laxity, bone robusticity, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis has been discussed; however, the problem has not yet been solved. The aim of the study was to examine the correlations between musculoskeletal stress markers, humeral robusticity and septal aperture. Additionally, the frequency of septal aperture according to sex, age, and skeletal side had been analysed. The skeletal material had come from a medieval cemetery in Cedynia, Poland. Skeletons of 201 adults (102 males, 99 females) had been examined and septal aperture had been scored. Six muscle attachment sites of upper limb bones had been analysed. Humeral robusticity had been calculated by use of the humeral robusticity index. The frequency of septal aperture among the population from Cedynia is 7.5%. There are no differences in septal aperture prevalence between males and females, the skeletal sides or age groups. In the analysed material, males with less developed muscle markers of right upper bones proved a higher predictable rate in having septal aperture (R = –0.34). On the left bones and among females, the converse correlation had also been found, but it is not statistically significant. The correlation between septal aperture and humeral robusticity is converse, yet small and insignificant. These results can confirm the theory of joint laxity and suggest that stronger bones (heavier muscles, more robust bones) increase joint tightness, and therefore protect the humeral lamina from septal aperture formation. But this theory needs a further detailed analysis.

Abstract

Many theories have been suggested in order to explain the aetiology of septal aperture. The influence of genes, the size and shape of ulna processes, joint laxity, bone robusticity, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis has been discussed; however, the problem has not yet been solved. The aim of the study was to examine the correlations between musculoskeletal stress markers, humeral robusticity and septal aperture. Additionally, the frequency of septal aperture according to sex, age, and skeletal side had been analysed. The skeletal material had come from a medieval cemetery in Cedynia, Poland. Skeletons of 201 adults (102 males, 99 females) had been examined and septal aperture had been scored. Six muscle attachment sites of upper limb bones had been analysed. Humeral robusticity had been calculated by use of the humeral robusticity index. The frequency of septal aperture among the population from Cedynia is 7.5%. There are no differences in septal aperture prevalence between males and females, the skeletal sides or age groups. In the analysed material, males with less developed muscle markers of right upper bones proved a higher predictable rate in having septal aperture (R = –0.34). On the left bones and among females, the converse correlation had also been found, but it is not statistically significant. The correlation between septal aperture and humeral robusticity is converse, yet small and insignificant. These results can confirm the theory of joint laxity and suggest that stronger bones (heavier muscles, more robust bones) increase joint tightness, and therefore protect the humeral lamina from septal aperture formation. But this theory needs a further detailed analysis.

Get Citation

Keywords

septal aperture, subtrochlear foramen, musculoskeletal stress markers, humeral robusticity, skeletal material

About this article
Title

Septal aperture aetiology: still more questions than answers

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 74, No 2 (2015)

Pages

219-224

Published online

2015-05-28

DOI

10.5603/FM.2015.0034

Pubmed

26050810

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2015;74(2):219-224.

Keywords

septal aperture
subtrochlear foramen
musculoskeletal stress markers
humeral robusticity
skeletal material

Authors

A. Myszka

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