open access

Vol 74, No 2 (2015)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-05-28
Submitted: 2014-07-18
Accepted: 2014-10-28
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Anatomy and clinical significance of the maxillary nerve: a literature review

I. M. Tomaszewska, H. Zwinczewska, T. Gładysz, J. A. Walocha
DOI: 10.5603/FM.2015.0025
·
Pubmed: 26050800
·
Folia Morphol 2015;74(2):150-156.

open access

Vol 74, No 2 (2015)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-05-28
Submitted: 2014-07-18
Accepted: 2014-10-28

Abstract

Background: The aim of this paper was to summarise the anatomical knowledge on the subject of the maxillary nerve and its branches, and to show the clinical usefulness of such information in producing anaesthesia in the region of the maxilla.

Materials and methods: A literature search was performed in Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases, including studies published up to June 2014, with no lower data limit.

Results: The maxillary nerve (V2) is the middle sized branch of the trigeminal nerve — the largest of the cranial nerves. The V2 is a purely sensory nerve supplying the maxillary teeth and gingiva, the adjoining part of the cheek, hard and soft palate mucosa, pharynx, nose, dura mater, skin of temple, face, lower eyelid and conjunctiva, upper lip, labial glands, oral mucosa, mucosa of the maxillary sinus, as well as the mobile part of the nasal septum. The branches of the maxillary nerve can be divided into four groups depending on the place of origin i.e. in the cranium, in the sphenopalatine fossa, in the infraorbital canal, and on the face.

Conclusions: This review summarises the data on the anatomy and variations of the maxillary nerve and its branches. A thorough understanding of the anatomy will allow for careful planning and execution of anaesthesiological and surgical procedures involving the maxillary nerve and its branches.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this paper was to summarise the anatomical knowledge on the subject of the maxillary nerve and its branches, and to show the clinical usefulness of such information in producing anaesthesia in the region of the maxilla.

Materials and methods: A literature search was performed in Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases, including studies published up to June 2014, with no lower data limit.

Results: The maxillary nerve (V2) is the middle sized branch of the trigeminal nerve — the largest of the cranial nerves. The V2 is a purely sensory nerve supplying the maxillary teeth and gingiva, the adjoining part of the cheek, hard and soft palate mucosa, pharynx, nose, dura mater, skin of temple, face, lower eyelid and conjunctiva, upper lip, labial glands, oral mucosa, mucosa of the maxillary sinus, as well as the mobile part of the nasal septum. The branches of the maxillary nerve can be divided into four groups depending on the place of origin i.e. in the cranium, in the sphenopalatine fossa, in the infraorbital canal, and on the face.

Conclusions: This review summarises the data on the anatomy and variations of the maxillary nerve and its branches. A thorough understanding of the anatomy will allow for careful planning and execution of anaesthesiological and surgical procedures involving the maxillary nerve and its branches.

Get Citation

Keywords

greater palatine nerve, infraorbital nerve, maxillary nerve, palate, nasopalatine nerve, sphenopalatine ganglion, trigeminal nerve, zygomatic nerve

About this article
Title

Anatomy and clinical significance of the maxillary nerve: a literature review

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 74, No 2 (2015)

Pages

150-156

Published online

2015-05-28

DOI

10.5603/FM.2015.0025

Pubmed

26050800

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2015;74(2):150-156.

Keywords

greater palatine nerve
infraorbital nerve
maxillary nerve
palate
nasopalatine nerve
sphenopalatine ganglion
trigeminal nerve
zygomatic nerve

Authors

I. M. Tomaszewska
H. Zwinczewska
T. Gładysz
J. A. Walocha

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