open access

Vol 74, No 1 (2015)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-03-02
Submitted: 2014-05-19
Accepted: 2014-08-03
Get Citation

Endplate calcification and cervical intervertebral disc degeneration: the role of endplate marrow contact channel occlusion

K. A. Tomaszewski, D. Adamek, T. Konopka, R. Tomaszewska, J. A. Walocha
DOI: 10.5603/FM.2015.0014
·
Pubmed: 25792401
·
Folia Morphol 2015;74(1):84-92.

open access

Vol 74, No 1 (2015)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-03-02
Submitted: 2014-05-19
Accepted: 2014-08-03

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the fundamental relationships between cervical intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, endplate calcification, and the patency of endplate marrow contact channels (MCC).

Materials and methods: Sixty cervical IVDs were excised from 30 human cadavers. After sectioning the specimens underwent micro computed tomography (microCT) — from all images the number, calibre, diameter and distribution of endplate openings were measured using ImageJ. Next, the specimens were scored for macroscopic degeneration (Thompson’s classification), and subsequently underwent histological analysis for both IVD and endplate degeneration (Boos’s classification) and calcification.

Results: The study group comprised 30 female and 30 male IVDs (mean age ± SD: 51.4 ± 19.5). Specimen’s age, macroscopic and microscopic degeneration correlated negatively with the number of MCCs (r = –0.33–(–0.95); p < 0.0001), apart from the MCCs > 300 μm in diameter (r = 0.66–0.79; p < 0.0001). The negative relationship was strongest for the MCCs 10–50 μm in diameter.

Conclusions: There is a strong negative correlation between the number of endplate MCCs, and both macroscopic and microscopic cervical IVD and endplate degeneration. This could further support the thesis that endplate calcification, through the occlusion of MCCs, leads to a fall in nutrient transport to the IVD, and subsequently causes its degeneration.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the fundamental relationships between cervical intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, endplate calcification, and the patency of endplate marrow contact channels (MCC).

Materials and methods: Sixty cervical IVDs were excised from 30 human cadavers. After sectioning the specimens underwent micro computed tomography (microCT) — from all images the number, calibre, diameter and distribution of endplate openings were measured using ImageJ. Next, the specimens were scored for macroscopic degeneration (Thompson’s classification), and subsequently underwent histological analysis for both IVD and endplate degeneration (Boos’s classification) and calcification.

Results: The study group comprised 30 female and 30 male IVDs (mean age ± SD: 51.4 ± 19.5). Specimen’s age, macroscopic and microscopic degeneration correlated negatively with the number of MCCs (r = –0.33–(–0.95); p < 0.0001), apart from the MCCs > 300 μm in diameter (r = 0.66–0.79; p < 0.0001). The negative relationship was strongest for the MCCs 10–50 μm in diameter.

Conclusions: There is a strong negative correlation between the number of endplate MCCs, and both macroscopic and microscopic cervical IVD and endplate degeneration. This could further support the thesis that endplate calcification, through the occlusion of MCCs, leads to a fall in nutrient transport to the IVD, and subsequently causes its degeneration.

Get Citation

Keywords

calcification, cervical intervertebral disc, degeneration, endplate, marrow contact channel occlusion

About this article
Title

Endplate calcification and cervical intervertebral disc degeneration: the role of endplate marrow contact channel occlusion

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 74, No 1 (2015)

Pages

84-92

Published online

2015-03-02

DOI

10.5603/FM.2015.0014

Pubmed

25792401

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2015;74(1):84-92.

Keywords

calcification
cervical intervertebral disc
degeneration
endplate
marrow contact channel occlusion

Authors

K. A. Tomaszewski
D. Adamek
T. Konopka
R. Tomaszewska
J. A. Walocha

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