open access

Vol 73, No 4 (2014)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2014-11-28
Submitted: 2014-01-23
Accepted: 2014-03-22
Get Citation

The influence of atherosclerotic abdominal aorta on the shape of duplicated inferior vena cava: its potential clinical implications and vascular complications

M. Polguj, M. Majos, M. Topol, A. Majos, L. Stefańczyk
DOI: 10.5603/FM.2014.0080
·
Folia Morphol 2014;73(4):521-526.

open access

Vol 73, No 4 (2014)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2014-11-28
Submitted: 2014-01-23
Accepted: 2014-03-22

Abstract

Duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is a congenital condition where there are 2 large vessels: right IVC (RIVC) and left IVC (LIVC) on both sides of the abdominal aorta. Here, we present 2 cases of duplicated inferior cava coexisting with rare morphology of left gonadal (ovarian/testicular) vein. Both were observed during multidetector 64-row computer tomography. In first case atherosclerotic, tortuous abdominal aorta models both inferior venae cavae. The shape of veins were more- (RIVC) and less-arcuate (LIVC). Two years ago, the patient had been diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism. In second case abdominal aortic aneurysm models both large veins. The RIVC has a highly right-arcuate shape, while the LIVC has a less left-arcade shape. Our observation would seem to be especially important, because the tortuous abdominal aorta changes the shape of both IVC, and may predispose them for thrombosis formation. The presented report precisely describes the topography and measurements of the vessels in the retroperitoneal area. The literature concerning this anomaly, potential clinical implications and vascular complications are reviewed and the possible practical aspects are discussed. A familiarity with the anatomy of the most common types of venous anomalies is crucial for all surgeons, urologists and oncologists to reduce the risk of severe haemorrhage during all abdominal procedures.

Abstract

Duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is a congenital condition where there are 2 large vessels: right IVC (RIVC) and left IVC (LIVC) on both sides of the abdominal aorta. Here, we present 2 cases of duplicated inferior cava coexisting with rare morphology of left gonadal (ovarian/testicular) vein. Both were observed during multidetector 64-row computer tomography. In first case atherosclerotic, tortuous abdominal aorta models both inferior venae cavae. The shape of veins were more- (RIVC) and less-arcuate (LIVC). Two years ago, the patient had been diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism. In second case abdominal aortic aneurysm models both large veins. The RIVC has a highly right-arcuate shape, while the LIVC has a less left-arcade shape. Our observation would seem to be especially important, because the tortuous abdominal aorta changes the shape of both IVC, and may predispose them for thrombosis formation. The presented report precisely describes the topography and measurements of the vessels in the retroperitoneal area. The literature concerning this anomaly, potential clinical implications and vascular complications are reviewed and the possible practical aspects are discussed. A familiarity with the anatomy of the most common types of venous anomalies is crucial for all surgeons, urologists and oncologists to reduce the risk of severe haemorrhage during all abdominal procedures.

Get Citation

Keywords

inferior vena cava, duplication, computed tomography angiography, anatomical variations

About this article
Title

The influence of atherosclerotic abdominal aorta on the shape of duplicated inferior vena cava: its potential clinical implications and vascular complications

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 73, No 4 (2014)

Pages

521-526

Published online

2014-11-28

DOI

10.5603/FM.2014.0080

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2014;73(4):521-526.

Keywords

inferior vena cava
duplication
computed tomography angiography
anatomical variations

Authors

M. Polguj
M. Majos
M. Topol
A. Majos
L. Stefańczyk

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl