open access

Vol 73, No 2 (2014)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2014-05-30
Submitted: 2013-08-31
Accepted: 2013-10-30
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Heart in anatomy history, radiology, anthropology and art

S. Marinković, D. Lazić, V. Kanjuh, S. Valjarević, I. Tomić, M. Aksić, A. Starčević
DOI: 10.5603/FM.2014.0018
·
Folia Morphol 2014;73(2):103-112.

open access

Vol 73, No 2 (2014)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2014-05-30
Submitted: 2013-08-31
Accepted: 2013-10-30

Abstract

Background: Anthropologic, artistic and medical significance of heart inspired usto undertake this multidisciplinary study.

Materials and methods: Amongst the 24 obtained echocardiograms and phonograms, 1 was used for a Photoshop processing. In addition, over 20,000 art work reproductions were examined in this study.

Results: Artistic and symbolic presentation of heart started some 15,000 years ago. First heart models were made by the Egyptian and Olmec civilisations. Ancient cultures regarded heart as the seat of the soul, spirit and intelligence. First anatomical and artistic images of heart were created by Leonardo da Vinci in the15th century, and first wax models by the Italian anatomists in the 17th century. Mediaeval religious symbolism of heart was replaced in the Renaissance and later on mainly by its role in the romantic love. Anatomical heart art continued in the 18th and 19th centuries through the works of Sénac, Cloquet, Hirschfeldand Bourgery. Some modern artists, such as Dalí, Kahlo, Rivera, Warhol, Ivanjicki, Vital, Kober and Mastrlova, created the anatomical heart images or sculptures, whereas some others, such as Duchamp, Klee, Miró, Matisse and Dine, presented heart symbol in their artworks. New radiologic technologies produce fine images of heart, some of which are similar to the works of modern artists.

Conclusions: Heart biology and symbolism have had a tremendous influence on our culture, including art and medical sciences. New radiologic techniques and computer technology have produced such images of heart, which substantially improved diagnosis, but also enhanced the heart aesthetics.

Abstract

Background: Anthropologic, artistic and medical significance of heart inspired usto undertake this multidisciplinary study.

Materials and methods: Amongst the 24 obtained echocardiograms and phonograms, 1 was used for a Photoshop processing. In addition, over 20,000 art work reproductions were examined in this study.

Results: Artistic and symbolic presentation of heart started some 15,000 years ago. First heart models were made by the Egyptian and Olmec civilisations. Ancient cultures regarded heart as the seat of the soul, spirit and intelligence. First anatomical and artistic images of heart were created by Leonardo da Vinci in the15th century, and first wax models by the Italian anatomists in the 17th century. Mediaeval religious symbolism of heart was replaced in the Renaissance and later on mainly by its role in the romantic love. Anatomical heart art continued in the 18th and 19th centuries through the works of Sénac, Cloquet, Hirschfeldand Bourgery. Some modern artists, such as Dalí, Kahlo, Rivera, Warhol, Ivanjicki, Vital, Kober and Mastrlova, created the anatomical heart images or sculptures, whereas some others, such as Duchamp, Klee, Miró, Matisse and Dine, presented heart symbol in their artworks. New radiologic technologies produce fine images of heart, some of which are similar to the works of modern artists.

Conclusions: Heart biology and symbolism have had a tremendous influence on our culture, including art and medical sciences. New radiologic techniques and computer technology have produced such images of heart, which substantially improved diagnosis, but also enhanced the heart aesthetics.

Get Citation

Keywords

anatomy, anthropology, culture, fine art, heart, history, radiology

About this article
Title

Heart in anatomy history, radiology, anthropology and art

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 73, No 2 (2014)

Pages

103-112

Published online

2014-05-30

DOI

10.5603/FM.2014.0018

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2014;73(2):103-112.

Keywords

anatomy
anthropology
culture
fine art
heart
history
radiology

Authors

S. Marinković
D. Lazić
V. Kanjuh
S. Valjarević
I. Tomić
M. Aksić
A. Starčević

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