open access

Vol 73, No 1 (2014)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2014-02-27
Submitted: 2013-07-05
Accepted: 2013-07-29
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Laryngeal nerve “anastomoses”

L. Naidu, L. Lazarus, P. Partab, K. S. Satyapal
DOI: 10.5603/FM.2014.0005
·
Folia Morphol 2014;73(1):30-36.

open access

Vol 73, No 1 (2014)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2014-02-27
Submitted: 2013-07-05
Accepted: 2013-07-29

Abstract

Laryngeal nerves have been observed to communicate with each other and forma variety of patterns. These communications have been studied extensively and have been of particular interest as it may provide an additional form of innervation to the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. Variations noted in incidence may help explain the variable position of the vocal folds after vocal fold paralysis. This study aimed to examine the incidence of various neural communications and to determine their contribution to the innervation of the larynx. Fifty adult cadaveric en-bloc laryngeal specimens were studied. Three different types of communications were observed between internal and recurrent laryngeal nerves viz. (1) Galen’s anastomosis (81%): in 13%, it was observed to supply the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle; (2) thyroarytenoid communication (9%): this was observed to supply the thyroarytenoid musclein 2% of specimens and (3) arytenoid plexus (28%): in 6%, it supplied a branch tothe transverse arytenoid muscle. The only communication between the externaland recurrent laryngeal nerves was the communicating nerve (25%). In one lefthemi-larynx, the internal laryngeal nerve formed a communication with the externall aryngeal nerve, via a thyroid foramen. The neural communications that exist in the larynx have been thought to play a role in laryngeal innervation. The results of this study have shown varying incidences in neural communications. Contributions fromthese communications have also been noted to various in trinsic laryngeal muscles which may be a possible factor responsible for the variable position of the vocalfolds in certain cases of vocal fold paralysis.

Abstract

Laryngeal nerves have been observed to communicate with each other and forma variety of patterns. These communications have been studied extensively and have been of particular interest as it may provide an additional form of innervation to the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. Variations noted in incidence may help explain the variable position of the vocal folds after vocal fold paralysis. This study aimed to examine the incidence of various neural communications and to determine their contribution to the innervation of the larynx. Fifty adult cadaveric en-bloc laryngeal specimens were studied. Three different types of communications were observed between internal and recurrent laryngeal nerves viz. (1) Galen’s anastomosis (81%): in 13%, it was observed to supply the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle; (2) thyroarytenoid communication (9%): this was observed to supply the thyroarytenoid musclein 2% of specimens and (3) arytenoid plexus (28%): in 6%, it supplied a branch tothe transverse arytenoid muscle. The only communication between the externaland recurrent laryngeal nerves was the communicating nerve (25%). In one lefthemi-larynx, the internal laryngeal nerve formed a communication with the externall aryngeal nerve, via a thyroid foramen. The neural communications that exist in the larynx have been thought to play a role in laryngeal innervation. The results of this study have shown varying incidences in neural communications. Contributions fromthese communications have also been noted to various in trinsic laryngeal muscles which may be a possible factor responsible for the variable position of the vocalfolds in certain cases of vocal fold paralysis.

Get Citation

Keywords

Galen’s anastomosis, thyroarytenoid, arytenoid

About this article
Title

Laryngeal nerve “anastomoses”

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 73, No 1 (2014)

Pages

30-36

Published online

2014-02-27

DOI

10.5603/FM.2014.0005

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2014;73(1):30-36.

Keywords

Galen’s anastomosis
thyroarytenoid
arytenoid

Authors

L. Naidu
L. Lazarus
P. Partab
K. S. Satyapal

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