open access

Vol 68, No 1 (2009)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2008-11-25
Submitted: 2012-02-06
Get Citation

A rare case of bilateral supernumerary heads of sternocleidomastoid muscle and its clinical impact

K. Natsis, I. Asouchidou, M. Vasileiou, E. Papathanasiou, G. Noussios, G. Paraskevas
Folia Morphol 2009;68(1):52-54.

open access

Vol 68, No 1 (2009)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2008-11-25
Submitted: 2012-02-06

Abstract

The sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) functions as a landmark for physicians such as anatomists, orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and anaesthesiologists, who intervene in the minor supraclavicular fossa located at the base of the neck. The variability of SCM anatomy may cause complications while trying to access the vital elements that are located in the minor supraclavicular fossa. This study aims to present a case of supernumerary heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and to discuss its clinical significance.
The cervical region of an elderly male cadaver was dissected and the findings were recorded and photographed.
On both sides, the SCM muscle had an additional sternal head, and simultaneously there were three additional clavicular heads, four in total. These additional heads, the sternal and the clavicular, reduced the interval between them causing significant stenosis of the minor supraclavicular fossa.
Sternocleidomastoid muscle variations with regard to the number of its heads are very rare in the literature, but this variation may cause severe complications. The minor supraclavicular fossa is important for anaesthesiologists because of the anterior central venous catheterization approach. Physicians should be aware of this anatomical variation in order to prevent complications

Abstract

The sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) functions as a landmark for physicians such as anatomists, orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and anaesthesiologists, who intervene in the minor supraclavicular fossa located at the base of the neck. The variability of SCM anatomy may cause complications while trying to access the vital elements that are located in the minor supraclavicular fossa. This study aims to present a case of supernumerary heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and to discuss its clinical significance.
The cervical region of an elderly male cadaver was dissected and the findings were recorded and photographed.
On both sides, the SCM muscle had an additional sternal head, and simultaneously there were three additional clavicular heads, four in total. These additional heads, the sternal and the clavicular, reduced the interval between them causing significant stenosis of the minor supraclavicular fossa.
Sternocleidomastoid muscle variations with regard to the number of its heads are very rare in the literature, but this variation may cause severe complications. The minor supraclavicular fossa is important for anaesthesiologists because of the anterior central venous catheterization approach. Physicians should be aware of this anatomical variation in order to prevent complications
Get Citation

Keywords

sternocleidomastoid muscle; heads; supernumerary

About this article
Title

A rare case of bilateral supernumerary heads of sternocleidomastoid muscle and its clinical impact

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 68, No 1 (2009)

Pages

52-54

Published online

2008-11-25

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2009;68(1):52-54.

Keywords

sternocleidomastoid muscle
heads
supernumerary

Authors

K. Natsis
I. Asouchidou
M. Vasileiou
E. Papathanasiou
G. Noussios
G. Paraskevas

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl