open access

Vol 59, No 3 (2021)
Original paper
Submitted: 2021-06-02
Accepted: 2021-09-23
Published online: 2021-09-28
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Distribution and neurochemical characteristic of the cardiac nerve structures in the heart of chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger Molina)

Malgorzata Radzimirska1, Jacek Kuchinka1, Tadeusz Kuder2, Elzbieta Nowak1, Wojciech Trybus1, Grzegorz Wrobel2, Aleksander Szczurkowski1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2021.0021
·
Pubmed: 34581422
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2021;59(3):157-166.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Medical Biology, Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomy, Collegium Medicum, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce, Poland, Poland

open access

Vol 59, No 3 (2021)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2021-06-02
Accepted: 2021-09-23
Published online: 2021-09-28

Abstract

Introduction. The heart innervation is made up of plexo-ganglionic formation containing sympathetic, parasympathetic, and sensory components. We examined the distribution and neurochemical coding of the ganglia and nerve fibers in the chinchilla’s heart. Material and methods. The heart sections of 10 male and 10 female adult chinchillas were processed in accordance with the thiocholine method for acetylcholine esterase (AChE), and the SPG method for detecting the presence of adrenergic fibers was applied. The routine technique of immunohistochemical (IHC) staining with primary antibodies directed against ChAT, VAChT, DbH, TH, CART, NPY, VIP, GAL and SOM was used. The secondary antibodies were conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488 and Alexa Fluor 555 fluorophores. Results. The epicardium contained ganglia and nerve fibers, the myocardium had a few ganglion neurocytes and nerve fibers, and the endocardium contained only nerve fibers. In the epicardium, AChE-positive fibers were more prevalent than SPG-positive fibers. All the ganglion cells were immunopositive for ChAT and VAChT. Some cells also had a positive reaction to DbH and TH. Fibers containing cholinergic and adrenergic markers were numerous, while many of them were ChAT/DbH- and VAChT/TH-positive. CART/NPY and CART/VIP, as well as CART and GAL, were observed to be colocalized in ganglion neurocytes, as well as in individual cells. The nerve fibers were found to contain all the neurotransmitters we tested for, as well as the following co-occurrences: ChAT/DbH, VAChT/TH, CART/NPY, CART/VIP, CART/GAL, and CART/SOM.

Conclusions. Our analysis of the neurochemical profile of the nerve structures in chinchilla’s heart showed that, despite interspecies differences, the general pattern of the distribution of autonomic nervous system structures is similar to that of other mammals’ species, including humans.

Abstract

Introduction. The heart innervation is made up of plexo-ganglionic formation containing sympathetic, parasympathetic, and sensory components. We examined the distribution and neurochemical coding of the ganglia and nerve fibers in the chinchilla’s heart. Material and methods. The heart sections of 10 male and 10 female adult chinchillas were processed in accordance with the thiocholine method for acetylcholine esterase (AChE), and the SPG method for detecting the presence of adrenergic fibers was applied. The routine technique of immunohistochemical (IHC) staining with primary antibodies directed against ChAT, VAChT, DbH, TH, CART, NPY, VIP, GAL and SOM was used. The secondary antibodies were conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488 and Alexa Fluor 555 fluorophores. Results. The epicardium contained ganglia and nerve fibers, the myocardium had a few ganglion neurocytes and nerve fibers, and the endocardium contained only nerve fibers. In the epicardium, AChE-positive fibers were more prevalent than SPG-positive fibers. All the ganglion cells were immunopositive for ChAT and VAChT. Some cells also had a positive reaction to DbH and TH. Fibers containing cholinergic and adrenergic markers were numerous, while many of them were ChAT/DbH- and VAChT/TH-positive. CART/NPY and CART/VIP, as well as CART and GAL, were observed to be colocalized in ganglion neurocytes, as well as in individual cells. The nerve fibers were found to contain all the neurotransmitters we tested for, as well as the following co-occurrences: ChAT/DbH, VAChT/TH, CART/NPY, CART/VIP, CART/GAL, and CART/SOM.

Conclusions. Our analysis of the neurochemical profile of the nerve structures in chinchilla’s heart showed that, despite interspecies differences, the general pattern of the distribution of autonomic nervous system structures is similar to that of other mammals’ species, including humans.

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Keywords

chinchilla; cardiac innervation; histochemistry; immunohistochemistry

About this article
Title

Distribution and neurochemical characteristic of the cardiac nerve structures in the heart of chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger Molina)

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 59, No 3 (2021)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

157-166

Published online

2021-09-28

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2021.0021

Pubmed

34581422

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2021;59(3):157-166.

Keywords

chinchilla
cardiac innervation
histochemistry
immunohistochemistry

Authors

Malgorzata Radzimirska
Jacek Kuchinka
Tadeusz Kuder
Elzbieta Nowak
Wojciech Trybus
Grzegorz Wrobel
Aleksander Szczurkowski

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