open access

Vol 58, No 3 (2020)
Review paper
Submitted: 2020-07-22
Accepted: 2020-09-17
Published online: 2020-09-24
Get Citation

An overview of applications of CRISPR-Cas technologies in biomedical engineering

Saleh Jamehdor123, Kasra Arbabi Zaboli4, Sina Naserian56, Jose Thekkiniath7, Honey Alef Omidy8, Ali Teimoori9, Behrooz Johari10, Amir Hossein Taromchi11, Yu Sasano12, Saeed Kaboli13
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2020.0023
·
Pubmed: 32978771
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(3):163-173.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
  2. Department of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Medical Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran
  3. Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan, Iran
  4. Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran
  5. INSERM UMR-S-MD 1197/Ministry of the Armed Forces, Biomedical Research Institute of the Armed Forces (IRBA), Paul-Brousse Hospital Villejuif, and CTSA Clamart, France
  6. SivanCell, Sivan Aryo Pharmed, Tehran, Iran
  7. Fuller Laboratories, Fullerton, CA, USA
  8. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  9. Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
  10. Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran
  11. Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran
  12. Department of Applied Microbial Technology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Life Science, Sojo University, Kumamoto, Japan
  13. Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran

open access

Vol 58, No 3 (2020)
REVIEW
Submitted: 2020-07-22
Accepted: 2020-09-17
Published online: 2020-09-24

Abstract

Clustered Regulatory Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) is one of the major genome editing systems and allows changing DNA levels of an organism. Among several CRISPR categories, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has shown a remarkable progression rate over its lifetime. Recently, other tools including CRISPR-Cas12 and CRISPR-Cas13 have been introduced. CRISPR-Cas9 system has played a key role in the industrial cell factory’s production and improved our understanding of genome function. Additionally, this system has been used as one of the major genome editing systems for the diagnosis and treatment of several infectious and non-infectious diseases. In this review, we discuss CRISPR biology, its versatility, and its application in biomedical engineering.

Abstract

Clustered Regulatory Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) is one of the major genome editing systems and allows changing DNA levels of an organism. Among several CRISPR categories, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has shown a remarkable progression rate over its lifetime. Recently, other tools including CRISPR-Cas12 and CRISPR-Cas13 have been introduced. CRISPR-Cas9 system has played a key role in the industrial cell factory’s production and improved our understanding of genome function. Additionally, this system has been used as one of the major genome editing systems for the diagnosis and treatment of several infectious and non-infectious diseases. In this review, we discuss CRISPR biology, its versatility, and its application in biomedical engineering.

Get Citation

Keywords

Genome editing; sgRNA; CRISPR-Cas9; CRISPR-Cas12; CRISPR-Cas13

About this article
Title

An overview of applications of CRISPR-Cas technologies in biomedical engineering

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 58, No 3 (2020)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

163-173

Published online

2020-09-24

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2020.0023

Pubmed

32978771

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(3):163-173.

Keywords

Genome editing
sgRNA
CRISPR-Cas9
CRISPR-Cas12
CRISPR-Cas13

Authors

Saleh Jamehdor
Kasra Arbabi Zaboli
Sina Naserian
Jose Thekkiniath
Honey Alef Omidy
Ali Teimoori
Behrooz Johari
Amir Hossein Taromchi
Yu Sasano
Saeed Kaboli

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